Exploring preschoolers' engagement and perceived physical competence in an autonomy-based object control skill intervention: A preliminary study

Samuel Logan, Leah Robinson, E. Kipling Webster, Laura Barber

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to describe children's engagement during two (high and low) autonomy-based climates. Twenty-five preschool children participated in a nine-week object control skill intervention. Children completed the object control subscale of the Test of Gross Motor Development 2nd Edition and the perceived physical competence subscale of Harter and Pike's Pictorial Scale of Perceived Competence and Social Acceptance (1984). Skill attempts were tallied by video analyses. A skill attempt was considered appropriate if the movement was consistent with the correct execution of the skill and the goal of the task. Findings indicate (a) no significant difference in appropriate skill attempts between each climate, (b) no significant difference in appropriate skill attempts of low- and high- skilled children in each climate, (c) regardless of climate, children improved in object control percentile and low-skilled children improved significantly more than high-skilled children, and (d) high-autonomy group children significantly improved in pre- to post- intervention on perceived competence compared to the low-autonomy group, regardless of skill level. High-autonomy climates provide variations of task difficulty that may promote the development of perceived physical competence of preschool children.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)302-314
Number of pages13
JournalEuropean Physical Education Review
Volume19
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2013
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Mental Competency
autonomy
Climate
climate
Preschool Children
preschool child
Esocidae
Social Distance
Group
video
acceptance

Keywords

  • children
  • motivation
  • motor skills
  • Task persistence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

Cite this

Exploring preschoolers' engagement and perceived physical competence in an autonomy-based object control skill intervention : A preliminary study. / Logan, Samuel; Robinson, Leah; Webster, E. Kipling; Barber, Laura.

In: European Physical Education Review, Vol. 19, No. 3, 01.10.2013, p. 302-314.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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