Exploring the Factor Structure of the Social Cognition and Object Relations–Global Rating Method: Support for Two- and Three-Factor Models

Caleb J. Siefert, Michelle Stein, Jenelle Slavin-Mulford, Greg Haggerty, Samuel J. Sinclair, Danielle Funke, Mark A. Blais

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The Social Cognition and Object Relations Scales–Global Rating Method (SCORS–G) contains 8 scales for coding narrative content. This study explores the factor structure of this measure using college (n = 171), outpatient (n = 239), and inpatient (n = 78) samples. Participants told stories to the Thematic Apperception Test (TAT; Murray, 1943) cards. Stories were transcribed and coded by blind raters using the SCORS–G. Cases were randomly assigned to an exploratory or validation group. Exploratory factor analysis with the exploratory group suggested 2- and 3-factor models. The Emotional Investment in Relationships (EIR) scale did not obtain a primary loading on any factor and was not included in subsequentmodels. After modifications, confirmatory factor analysis indicated good-to-adequate fit for 2- and 3-factor models. Both models showed good fit in the validation group and met criteria for invariance across models. Findings indicated that some SCORS–G scales tap cognitive-structural elements, whereas others assess affective-relational components of narratives. We found mild support separating the affective-relational scales in terms of internal representations for the self and others and relationships. The results reported here indicate that clinicians and researchers can calculate a separate cognitive-structural composite score and an affective-relational composite score when using the SCORS–G to rate TAT stories.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)122-134
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Personality Assessment
Volume100
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 4 2018

Fingerprint

Cognition
Statistical Factor Analysis
Thematic Apperception Test
Ego
Inpatients
Outpatients
Research Personnel
Object Attachment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

Cite this

Exploring the Factor Structure of the Social Cognition and Object Relations–Global Rating Method : Support for Two- and Three-Factor Models. / Siefert, Caleb J.; Stein, Michelle; Slavin-Mulford, Jenelle; Haggerty, Greg; Sinclair, Samuel J.; Funke, Danielle; Blais, Mark A.

In: Journal of Personality Assessment, Vol. 100, No. 2, 04.03.2018, p. 122-134.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Siefert, Caleb J. ; Stein, Michelle ; Slavin-Mulford, Jenelle ; Haggerty, Greg ; Sinclair, Samuel J. ; Funke, Danielle ; Blais, Mark A. / Exploring the Factor Structure of the Social Cognition and Object Relations–Global Rating Method : Support for Two- and Three-Factor Models. In: Journal of Personality Assessment. 2018 ; Vol. 100, No. 2. pp. 122-134.
@article{df96a4d4d7dd4b988362e30a0791ec05,
title = "Exploring the Factor Structure of the Social Cognition and Object Relations–Global Rating Method: Support for Two- and Three-Factor Models",
abstract = "The Social Cognition and Object Relations Scales–Global Rating Method (SCORS–G) contains 8 scales for coding narrative content. This study explores the factor structure of this measure using college (n = 171), outpatient (n = 239), and inpatient (n = 78) samples. Participants told stories to the Thematic Apperception Test (TAT; Murray, 1943) cards. Stories were transcribed and coded by blind raters using the SCORS–G. Cases were randomly assigned to an exploratory or validation group. Exploratory factor analysis with the exploratory group suggested 2- and 3-factor models. The Emotional Investment in Relationships (EIR) scale did not obtain a primary loading on any factor and was not included in subsequentmodels. After modifications, confirmatory factor analysis indicated good-to-adequate fit for 2- and 3-factor models. Both models showed good fit in the validation group and met criteria for invariance across models. Findings indicated that some SCORS–G scales tap cognitive-structural elements, whereas others assess affective-relational components of narratives. We found mild support separating the affective-relational scales in terms of internal representations for the self and others and relationships. The results reported here indicate that clinicians and researchers can calculate a separate cognitive-structural composite score and an affective-relational composite score when using the SCORS–G to rate TAT stories.",
author = "Siefert, {Caleb J.} and Michelle Stein and Jenelle Slavin-Mulford and Greg Haggerty and Sinclair, {Samuel J.} and Danielle Funke and Blais, {Mark A.}",
year = "2018",
month = "3",
day = "4",
doi = "10.1080/00223891.2017.1336716",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "100",
pages = "122--134",
journal = "Journal of Personality Assessment",
issn = "0022-3891",
publisher = "Taylor and Francis Ltd.",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Exploring the Factor Structure of the Social Cognition and Object Relations–Global Rating Method

T2 - Support for Two- and Three-Factor Models

AU - Siefert, Caleb J.

AU - Stein, Michelle

AU - Slavin-Mulford, Jenelle

AU - Haggerty, Greg

AU - Sinclair, Samuel J.

AU - Funke, Danielle

AU - Blais, Mark A.

PY - 2018/3/4

Y1 - 2018/3/4

N2 - The Social Cognition and Object Relations Scales–Global Rating Method (SCORS–G) contains 8 scales for coding narrative content. This study explores the factor structure of this measure using college (n = 171), outpatient (n = 239), and inpatient (n = 78) samples. Participants told stories to the Thematic Apperception Test (TAT; Murray, 1943) cards. Stories were transcribed and coded by blind raters using the SCORS–G. Cases were randomly assigned to an exploratory or validation group. Exploratory factor analysis with the exploratory group suggested 2- and 3-factor models. The Emotional Investment in Relationships (EIR) scale did not obtain a primary loading on any factor and was not included in subsequentmodels. After modifications, confirmatory factor analysis indicated good-to-adequate fit for 2- and 3-factor models. Both models showed good fit in the validation group and met criteria for invariance across models. Findings indicated that some SCORS–G scales tap cognitive-structural elements, whereas others assess affective-relational components of narratives. We found mild support separating the affective-relational scales in terms of internal representations for the self and others and relationships. The results reported here indicate that clinicians and researchers can calculate a separate cognitive-structural composite score and an affective-relational composite score when using the SCORS–G to rate TAT stories.

AB - The Social Cognition and Object Relations Scales–Global Rating Method (SCORS–G) contains 8 scales for coding narrative content. This study explores the factor structure of this measure using college (n = 171), outpatient (n = 239), and inpatient (n = 78) samples. Participants told stories to the Thematic Apperception Test (TAT; Murray, 1943) cards. Stories were transcribed and coded by blind raters using the SCORS–G. Cases were randomly assigned to an exploratory or validation group. Exploratory factor analysis with the exploratory group suggested 2- and 3-factor models. The Emotional Investment in Relationships (EIR) scale did not obtain a primary loading on any factor and was not included in subsequentmodels. After modifications, confirmatory factor analysis indicated good-to-adequate fit for 2- and 3-factor models. Both models showed good fit in the validation group and met criteria for invariance across models. Findings indicated that some SCORS–G scales tap cognitive-structural elements, whereas others assess affective-relational components of narratives. We found mild support separating the affective-relational scales in terms of internal representations for the self and others and relationships. The results reported here indicate that clinicians and researchers can calculate a separate cognitive-structural composite score and an affective-relational composite score when using the SCORS–G to rate TAT stories.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85021246912&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85021246912&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1080/00223891.2017.1336716

DO - 10.1080/00223891.2017.1336716

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:85021246912

VL - 100

SP - 122

EP - 134

JO - Journal of Personality Assessment

JF - Journal of Personality Assessment

SN - 0022-3891

IS - 2

ER -