Exploring the tensions between narrative imagination and official knowledge through the life of pi

Laura Jean Rychly, Robert Lake

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

In this chapter we borrow the experiences had by the main character of Yann Martel's 2013 novel, Life of Pi, to show how imagination is a tool we use to help us survive. We explain that in many ways, because of the work involved to make sense out of new and unfamiliar things, children are surviving the hard work of growing up that is childhood. Drawing these two points together we make a case for children needing greater access to their imaginations than they currently have in their schooling experiences. Metaphorical thinking is one way we learn to think about new things; our imaginations help us to make connections between something we do know or understand and something new. The chapter ends with a few suggestions for ways teachers can give students access to this important survival tool which, as it did for Pi, will help them come to terms with that which would otherwise be too treacherous or frightening.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationTeaching towards Democracy with Postmodern and Popular Culture Texts
PublisherSense Publishers
Pages151-164
Number of pages14
ISBN (Electronic)9789462098756
ISBN (Print)9789462098749
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Sciences(all)

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    Rychly, L. J., & Lake, R. (2014). Exploring the tensions between narrative imagination and official knowledge through the life of pi. In Teaching towards Democracy with Postmodern and Popular Culture Texts (pp. 151-164). Sense Publishers. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-6209-875-6_10