Factors Related to Adherence to Opioids in Black Patients With Cancer Pain

Katherine A. Yeager, Bryan L Williams, Jinbing Bai, Hannah L.F. Cooper, Tammie Quest, Salimah H. Meghani, Deborah W. Bruner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Context: Cancer pain relief is often inadequate because of poor adherence to pain medication, especially for black patients. Objectives: The purpose of this study is to describe factors related to adherence to around-the-clock opioids among 110 black patients being treated for cancer pain. Methods: Sociodemographic, clinical, symptoms, and social support data were collected at baseline; pain and adherence data were collected at 30 days. Associations between these variables and opioid adherence measured by Medication Event Monitoring System were estimated using multiple regression. Results: Mean age was 56 (±10.1), the majority were women (63%) and college educated (56%). Mean pain severity at baseline equaled 4.6 (±2.3). Mean dose adherence was 60% (±28.5), while mean schedule adherence was 33.0% (±31.0). In adjusted analysis, 26% of the variance in dose adherence was explained by recent chemotherapy, changes in pain, concerns about nausea, and doctors’ focus on cure versus pain control (P<0.001); 27% of the variance in schedule adherence was explained by recent chemotherapy, changes in pain, symptom burden, and concerns about doctors focus on cure versus pain control (P<0.001). Conclusion: Findings confirm pain medication adherence is poor and pain was not well relieved. Multiple factors influence adherence to around-the-clock opioids. Clinicians need to partner with patients by providing a personalized pain treatment plan including an in-depth assessment of treatment choices and adherence.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)28-36
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Pain and Symptom Management
Volume57
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

Fingerprint

Opioid Analgesics
Pain
Medication Adherence
Appointments and Schedules
Cancer Pain
Drug Therapy
Social Support
Nausea
Analysis of Variance
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Black race
  • Cancer pain
  • adherence
  • electronic monitoring
  • opioids

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine

Cite this

Factors Related to Adherence to Opioids in Black Patients With Cancer Pain. / Yeager, Katherine A.; Williams, Bryan L; Bai, Jinbing; Cooper, Hannah L.F.; Quest, Tammie; Meghani, Salimah H.; Bruner, Deborah W.

In: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management, Vol. 57, No. 1, 01.01.2019, p. 28-36.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Yeager, Katherine A. ; Williams, Bryan L ; Bai, Jinbing ; Cooper, Hannah L.F. ; Quest, Tammie ; Meghani, Salimah H. ; Bruner, Deborah W. / Factors Related to Adherence to Opioids in Black Patients With Cancer Pain. In: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management. 2019 ; Vol. 57, No. 1. pp. 28-36.
@article{c3117abb98474eb69830486df157a76e,
title = "Factors Related to Adherence to Opioids in Black Patients With Cancer Pain",
abstract = "Context: Cancer pain relief is often inadequate because of poor adherence to pain medication, especially for black patients. Objectives: The purpose of this study is to describe factors related to adherence to around-the-clock opioids among 110 black patients being treated for cancer pain. Methods: Sociodemographic, clinical, symptoms, and social support data were collected at baseline; pain and adherence data were collected at 30 days. Associations between these variables and opioid adherence measured by Medication Event Monitoring System were estimated using multiple regression. Results: Mean age was 56 (±10.1), the majority were women (63{\%}) and college educated (56{\%}). Mean pain severity at baseline equaled 4.6 (±2.3). Mean dose adherence was 60{\%} (±28.5), while mean schedule adherence was 33.0{\%} (±31.0). In adjusted analysis, 26{\%} of the variance in dose adherence was explained by recent chemotherapy, changes in pain, concerns about nausea, and doctors’ focus on cure versus pain control (P<0.001); 27{\%} of the variance in schedule adherence was explained by recent chemotherapy, changes in pain, symptom burden, and concerns about doctors focus on cure versus pain control (P<0.001). Conclusion: Findings confirm pain medication adherence is poor and pain was not well relieved. Multiple factors influence adherence to around-the-clock opioids. Clinicians need to partner with patients by providing a personalized pain treatment plan including an in-depth assessment of treatment choices and adherence.",
keywords = "Black race, Cancer pain, adherence, electronic monitoring, opioids",
author = "Yeager, {Katherine A.} and Williams, {Bryan L} and Jinbing Bai and Cooper, {Hannah L.F.} and Tammie Quest and Meghani, {Salimah H.} and Bruner, {Deborah W.}",
year = "2019",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.jpainsymman.2018.10.491",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "57",
pages = "28--36",
journal = "Journal of Pain and Symptom Management",
issn = "0885-3924",
publisher = "Elsevier Inc.",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Factors Related to Adherence to Opioids in Black Patients With Cancer Pain

AU - Yeager, Katherine A.

AU - Williams, Bryan L

AU - Bai, Jinbing

AU - Cooper, Hannah L.F.

AU - Quest, Tammie

AU - Meghani, Salimah H.

AU - Bruner, Deborah W.

PY - 2019/1/1

Y1 - 2019/1/1

N2 - Context: Cancer pain relief is often inadequate because of poor adherence to pain medication, especially for black patients. Objectives: The purpose of this study is to describe factors related to adherence to around-the-clock opioids among 110 black patients being treated for cancer pain. Methods: Sociodemographic, clinical, symptoms, and social support data were collected at baseline; pain and adherence data were collected at 30 days. Associations between these variables and opioid adherence measured by Medication Event Monitoring System were estimated using multiple regression. Results: Mean age was 56 (±10.1), the majority were women (63%) and college educated (56%). Mean pain severity at baseline equaled 4.6 (±2.3). Mean dose adherence was 60% (±28.5), while mean schedule adherence was 33.0% (±31.0). In adjusted analysis, 26% of the variance in dose adherence was explained by recent chemotherapy, changes in pain, concerns about nausea, and doctors’ focus on cure versus pain control (P<0.001); 27% of the variance in schedule adherence was explained by recent chemotherapy, changes in pain, symptom burden, and concerns about doctors focus on cure versus pain control (P<0.001). Conclusion: Findings confirm pain medication adherence is poor and pain was not well relieved. Multiple factors influence adherence to around-the-clock opioids. Clinicians need to partner with patients by providing a personalized pain treatment plan including an in-depth assessment of treatment choices and adherence.

AB - Context: Cancer pain relief is often inadequate because of poor adherence to pain medication, especially for black patients. Objectives: The purpose of this study is to describe factors related to adherence to around-the-clock opioids among 110 black patients being treated for cancer pain. Methods: Sociodemographic, clinical, symptoms, and social support data were collected at baseline; pain and adherence data were collected at 30 days. Associations between these variables and opioid adherence measured by Medication Event Monitoring System were estimated using multiple regression. Results: Mean age was 56 (±10.1), the majority were women (63%) and college educated (56%). Mean pain severity at baseline equaled 4.6 (±2.3). Mean dose adherence was 60% (±28.5), while mean schedule adherence was 33.0% (±31.0). In adjusted analysis, 26% of the variance in dose adherence was explained by recent chemotherapy, changes in pain, concerns about nausea, and doctors’ focus on cure versus pain control (P<0.001); 27% of the variance in schedule adherence was explained by recent chemotherapy, changes in pain, symptom burden, and concerns about doctors focus on cure versus pain control (P<0.001). Conclusion: Findings confirm pain medication adherence is poor and pain was not well relieved. Multiple factors influence adherence to around-the-clock opioids. Clinicians need to partner with patients by providing a personalized pain treatment plan including an in-depth assessment of treatment choices and adherence.

KW - Black race

KW - Cancer pain

KW - adherence

KW - electronic monitoring

KW - opioids

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85058932991&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85058932991&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.jpainsymman.2018.10.491

DO - 10.1016/j.jpainsymman.2018.10.491

M3 - Article

C2 - 30316809

AN - SCOPUS:85058932991

VL - 57

SP - 28

EP - 36

JO - Journal of Pain and Symptom Management

JF - Journal of Pain and Symptom Management

SN - 0885-3924

IS - 1

ER -