Factors related to methacholine airway responsiveness in children

Dennis Randall Ownby, Edward L. Peterson, Christine C. Johnson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

28 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Studies of airway responsiveness (AR) have typically used similar dose schedules of methacholine for adults and children despite large ranges in subject size. Reported declines in AR with increasing age in children could be due to maturational changes or to proportionately smaller doses of methacholine in taller (older) children. Other investigators have related both height and various measures of lung function to AR. We examined data related to AR in 471 children, aged 6 to 8 yr, from a birth cohort. Each child underwent spirometry followed by sequential challenge with five doses of methacholine, ranging from 0.025 to 25 mg/ml, given with a dosimeter. Continuous slope and end FEV1-change indexes of responsiveness were computed. Using stepwise regression modeling, we found no significant association between AR and either height or age after entering a variable reflecting asthma or wheezing. In contrast, we found that baseline measures of FVC, FEV1/FVC, and FEF25-75(%) were significantly related to AR after controlling for other variables (p = 0.001). However, when all three of the latter measures were added to models, FEF25-75(%) was most closely related to AR. We conclude that after control for other variables, FEF25- 75(%) and FVC, but not height, are significantly related to methacholine responsiveness in children.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1578-1583
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine
Volume161
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2000

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Methacholine Chloride
Spirometry
Respiratory Sounds
Appointments and Schedules
Asthma
Research Personnel
Parturition
Lung

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine

Cite this

Factors related to methacholine airway responsiveness in children. / Ownby, Dennis Randall; Peterson, Edward L.; Johnson, Christine C.

In: American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, Vol. 161, No. 5, 01.01.2000, p. 1578-1583.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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