Failed sanctions: Why the U.S. Embargo against Cuba could never work

Research output: Book/ReportBook

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

For almost five decades, the United States has maintained a comprehensive economic embargo on Cuba. U.S.-based travel to the island is severely restricted, and most financial and commercial transactions with Cuba are illegal for U.S. citizens. In the 1990s the United States tightened the embargo further, seeking to promote change in Cuba by depriving the Castro government of hard currency revenues. And yet the stalemate remains. How effective has the embargo been in achieving its main goal? Paolo Spadoni dispassionately answers, "Not very." By extending his analysis to non-state actors (including multinational corporations, migrants, international travelers, indirect investors, and food exporters), Spadoni demonstrates that the United States has not only been unable to stifle the flow of foreign investment into Cuba but has actually contributed to the recovery of the Cuban economy, particularly from the deep recession it entered following the demise of the Soviet Union. Failed Sanctions is a must-read book for those who closely follow Cuban-U.S. relations and for anyone interested in the efficacy of economic sanctions as a foreign policy tool.

Original languageEnglish (US)
PublisherUniversity Press of Florida
Number of pages230
ISBN (Print)0813035155, 9780813035154
StatePublished - Dec 1 2010

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embargo
Cuba
sanction
economic sanction
US citizen
multinational corporation
recession
foreign investment
currency
investor
USSR
transaction
foreign policy
revenue
migrant
travel
food
economy
economics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Sciences(all)

Cite this

Failed sanctions : Why the U.S. Embargo against Cuba could never work. / Spadoni, Paolo.

University Press of Florida, 2010. 230 p.

Research output: Book/ReportBook

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