Family history as a risk factor for the polycystic ovary syndrome

Ricardo Azziz, M. D. Kashar-Miller

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

51 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We have prospectively studied, by interview, clinical examination and biochemical evaluation, the relatives of 195 consecutive PCOS patients in order to: 1) accurately determine the prevalence of PCOS, as defined by current endocrinological criteria, among first-degree relatives of affected patients, and 2) determine the overall accuracy of proband-only and family member (self report) interview for the detection of clinically evident PCOS within families. We noted that 35% of mothers and 40% of sisters of patients with PCOS will be affected by PCOS themselves. Overall, the interview using a standardized form, whether of the proband or the family relative directly, appears to be a reliable predictor of affected status in mothers. Alternatively, approximately 50% of sisters will be missed using the proband interview, although self-reporting appears to be a reasonably reliable predictor of affected status for these relatives. While we are unable to exclude an autosomal or X-linked dominant mode of inheritance, the heritability of PCOS is probably more complex, similar to that of diabetes mellitus type 2 and cardiovascular disease. In absence of molecular diagnostic markers, a positive family history appears to be the most informative risk factor for the development PCOS.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1303-1306
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Pediatric Endocrinology and Metabolism
Volume13
Issue numberSUPPL. 5
StatePublished - Dec 13 2000

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Polycystic Ovary Syndrome
Interviews
Siblings
Mothers
Molecular Pathology
Self Report
Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Cardiovascular Diseases

Keywords

  • Family history
  • Inheritance
  • Polycystic ovary syndrome
  • Risk factor

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Endocrinology

Cite this

Family history as a risk factor for the polycystic ovary syndrome. / Azziz, Ricardo; Kashar-Miller, M. D.

In: Journal of Pediatric Endocrinology and Metabolism, Vol. 13, No. SUPPL. 5, 13.12.2000, p. 1303-1306.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Azziz, R & Kashar-Miller, MD 2000, 'Family history as a risk factor for the polycystic ovary syndrome', Journal of Pediatric Endocrinology and Metabolism, vol. 13, no. SUPPL. 5, pp. 1303-1306.
Azziz, Ricardo ; Kashar-Miller, M. D. / Family history as a risk factor for the polycystic ovary syndrome. In: Journal of Pediatric Endocrinology and Metabolism. 2000 ; Vol. 13, No. SUPPL. 5. pp. 1303-1306.
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