Family therapy for eating disorders

Christian Lemmon, A. M. Josephson

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

It is a perpetual source of debate whether dysfunctional family communication and relationship patterns cause eating disorders or the stress associated with raising a child with an eating disorder elicits such problems. Regardless, family therapy is a necessary component of any comprehensive biopsychosocial approach to the treatment of eating disorders. A careful assessment of the entire family, including the identified patient; his or her parents and siblings; the parents' marriage and families origin; the child's emotional, social, and physical development; parental regulation of developmental stages; and communication patterns is mandatory. Family therapy for eating-disordered patients attempts to facilitate the elimination of potentially life-threatening symptoms and begin a therapeutic process of change within the entire family. Research has shown significant support for the use of family therapy in this population, but well-controlled treatment outcome research remains somewhat limited.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)519-542
Number of pages24
JournalChild and Adolescent Psychiatric Clinics of North America
Volume10
Issue number3
StatePublished - Jun 26 2001

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Family Therapy
Parents
Communication
Marriage
Siblings
Eating
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Feeding and Eating Disorders
Therapeutics
Research
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Family therapy for eating disorders. / Lemmon, Christian; Josephson, A. M.

In: Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Clinics of North America, Vol. 10, No. 3, 26.06.2001, p. 519-542.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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