Feasibility and Benefit of Incorporating a Multimedia Cadaver Laboratory Training Program into a Didactics Curriculum for Junior and Senior Surgical Residents

Erika Simmerman, Andrew Simmerman, Randi Lassiter, Ray King, Ben Ham, Bao Ling Adam, Colville Ferdinand, Steven Holsten

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: As operative experience in general surgery decreases and work hour limitations increase there is less exposure of surgical residents to advanced vascular and trauma exposures. Many institutions have demonstrated benefits of cadaver laboratory courses. We have incorporated a multimedia cadaver laboratory course into our general surgery residency didactics curriculum with the objective to demonstrate a benefit of the program as well as the feasibility of incorporation. Study Design: This is a prospective study at a tertiary care institution including general surgery residents within our residency program. A curriculum was designed, requiring residents to complete multimedia learning modules before both a trauma cadaver laboratory and vascular exposure cadaver laboratory. Outcome measures included self-efficacy/confidence (precourse and postcourse 5-point Likert surveys), knowledge (net performance on precourse and postcourse multiple choice examinations), and resident perception of the curriculum (postcourse 5-point Likert survey). Data were analyzed using ANOVA paired t-tests. Results: For the vascular cadaver laboratory, resident knowledge improved overall from an average of 41.2% to 50.0% of questions correct (p = 0.032) and self-efficacy/confidence improved by 0.59 from 1.52 to 2.11 out of 5 (p = 0.009). Median confidence is 1.37 out of 5 and 2.32 out of 5, before and after course, respectively. Wilcoxon nonparametric test reveals a p = 0.011. Resident's perception of the usefulness of the laboratory evaluation was 3.85 out 5. There were 85.71% agreed that the laboratory is useful and 14.29% were disagree. The Z-score is −0.1579 (means 0.1579 standard deviations a score of 3.85 below the benchmark). The percentile rank is 56.27%. The coefficient of variation is 24.68%. For the trauma cadaver laboratory, resident knowledge improved overall from an average of 55.89% to 66.17% of questions correct (p = 0.001) and self-efficacy/confidence improved by 0.75 from 1.68 out of 5 to 2.43 out of 5 (p = 0.011). Median confidence level is 1.41 out of 5 before the training course and 2.64 out of 5 after the training course. Wilcoxon signed rank test gives a p value of 0.008. Resident's perception of the usefulness of the laboratory evaluation was 3.94 out 5. There were 72.22% agreed that the laboratory is useful and 27.78% were neutral. The Z-score is −0.098 (means 0.098 standard deviations a score of 3.94 below the benchmark). The percentile rank is 53.90%. The coefficient of variation is 15.48%. Conclusions: Incorporating a multimedia cadaver laboratory into a residency education didactics curriculum was both feasible and beneficial for resident education. We demonstrate an improvement in knowledge and self efficacy/confidence following both cadaver laboratory courses.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1188-1194
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of surgical education
Volume75
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2018

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Multimedia
Cadaver
didactics
Curriculum
multimedia
training program
resident
Education
curriculum
confidence
Self Efficacy
self-efficacy
Internship and Residency
surgery
Blood Vessels
trauma
Benchmarking
Wounds and Injuries
Tertiary Healthcare
Nonparametric Statistics

Keywords

  • Medical Knowledge
  • Patient Care
  • Practice-Based Learning and Improvement
  • cadaver laboratory
  • surgery residency
  • surgical resident education
  • surgical simulation
  • trauma simulation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Education

Cite this

Feasibility and Benefit of Incorporating a Multimedia Cadaver Laboratory Training Program into a Didactics Curriculum for Junior and Senior Surgical Residents. / Simmerman, Erika; Simmerman, Andrew; Lassiter, Randi; King, Ray; Ham, Ben; Adam, Bao Ling; Ferdinand, Colville; Holsten, Steven.

In: Journal of surgical education, Vol. 75, No. 5, 01.09.2018, p. 1188-1194.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Simmerman, Erika ; Simmerman, Andrew ; Lassiter, Randi ; King, Ray ; Ham, Ben ; Adam, Bao Ling ; Ferdinand, Colville ; Holsten, Steven. / Feasibility and Benefit of Incorporating a Multimedia Cadaver Laboratory Training Program into a Didactics Curriculum for Junior and Senior Surgical Residents. In: Journal of surgical education. 2018 ; Vol. 75, No. 5. pp. 1188-1194.
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abstract = "Objective: As operative experience in general surgery decreases and work hour limitations increase there is less exposure of surgical residents to advanced vascular and trauma exposures. Many institutions have demonstrated benefits of cadaver laboratory courses. We have incorporated a multimedia cadaver laboratory course into our general surgery residency didactics curriculum with the objective to demonstrate a benefit of the program as well as the feasibility of incorporation. Study Design: This is a prospective study at a tertiary care institution including general surgery residents within our residency program. A curriculum was designed, requiring residents to complete multimedia learning modules before both a trauma cadaver laboratory and vascular exposure cadaver laboratory. Outcome measures included self-efficacy/confidence (precourse and postcourse 5-point Likert surveys), knowledge (net performance on precourse and postcourse multiple choice examinations), and resident perception of the curriculum (postcourse 5-point Likert survey). Data were analyzed using ANOVA paired t-tests. Results: For the vascular cadaver laboratory, resident knowledge improved overall from an average of 41.2{\%} to 50.0{\%} of questions correct (p = 0.032) and self-efficacy/confidence improved by 0.59 from 1.52 to 2.11 out of 5 (p = 0.009). Median confidence is 1.37 out of 5 and 2.32 out of 5, before and after course, respectively. Wilcoxon nonparametric test reveals a p = 0.011. Resident's perception of the usefulness of the laboratory evaluation was 3.85 out 5. There were 85.71{\%} agreed that the laboratory is useful and 14.29{\%} were disagree. The Z-score is −0.1579 (means 0.1579 standard deviations a score of 3.85 below the benchmark). The percentile rank is 56.27{\%}. The coefficient of variation is 24.68{\%}. For the trauma cadaver laboratory, resident knowledge improved overall from an average of 55.89{\%} to 66.17{\%} of questions correct (p = 0.001) and self-efficacy/confidence improved by 0.75 from 1.68 out of 5 to 2.43 out of 5 (p = 0.011). Median confidence level is 1.41 out of 5 before the training course and 2.64 out of 5 after the training course. Wilcoxon signed rank test gives a p value of 0.008. Resident's perception of the usefulness of the laboratory evaluation was 3.94 out 5. There were 72.22{\%} agreed that the laboratory is useful and 27.78{\%} were neutral. The Z-score is −0.098 (means 0.098 standard deviations a score of 3.94 below the benchmark). The percentile rank is 53.90{\%}. The coefficient of variation is 15.48{\%}. Conclusions: Incorporating a multimedia cadaver laboratory into a residency education didactics curriculum was both feasible and beneficial for resident education. We demonstrate an improvement in knowledge and self efficacy/confidence following both cadaver laboratory courses.",
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author = "Erika Simmerman and Andrew Simmerman and Randi Lassiter and Ray King and Ben Ham and Adam, {Bao Ling} and Colville Ferdinand and Steven Holsten",
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T1 - Feasibility and Benefit of Incorporating a Multimedia Cadaver Laboratory Training Program into a Didactics Curriculum for Junior and Senior Surgical Residents

AU - Simmerman, Erika

AU - Simmerman, Andrew

AU - Lassiter, Randi

AU - King, Ray

AU - Ham, Ben

AU - Adam, Bao Ling

AU - Ferdinand, Colville

AU - Holsten, Steven

PY - 2018/9/1

Y1 - 2018/9/1

N2 - Objective: As operative experience in general surgery decreases and work hour limitations increase there is less exposure of surgical residents to advanced vascular and trauma exposures. Many institutions have demonstrated benefits of cadaver laboratory courses. We have incorporated a multimedia cadaver laboratory course into our general surgery residency didactics curriculum with the objective to demonstrate a benefit of the program as well as the feasibility of incorporation. Study Design: This is a prospective study at a tertiary care institution including general surgery residents within our residency program. A curriculum was designed, requiring residents to complete multimedia learning modules before both a trauma cadaver laboratory and vascular exposure cadaver laboratory. Outcome measures included self-efficacy/confidence (precourse and postcourse 5-point Likert surveys), knowledge (net performance on precourse and postcourse multiple choice examinations), and resident perception of the curriculum (postcourse 5-point Likert survey). Data were analyzed using ANOVA paired t-tests. Results: For the vascular cadaver laboratory, resident knowledge improved overall from an average of 41.2% to 50.0% of questions correct (p = 0.032) and self-efficacy/confidence improved by 0.59 from 1.52 to 2.11 out of 5 (p = 0.009). Median confidence is 1.37 out of 5 and 2.32 out of 5, before and after course, respectively. Wilcoxon nonparametric test reveals a p = 0.011. Resident's perception of the usefulness of the laboratory evaluation was 3.85 out 5. There were 85.71% agreed that the laboratory is useful and 14.29% were disagree. The Z-score is −0.1579 (means 0.1579 standard deviations a score of 3.85 below the benchmark). The percentile rank is 56.27%. The coefficient of variation is 24.68%. For the trauma cadaver laboratory, resident knowledge improved overall from an average of 55.89% to 66.17% of questions correct (p = 0.001) and self-efficacy/confidence improved by 0.75 from 1.68 out of 5 to 2.43 out of 5 (p = 0.011). Median confidence level is 1.41 out of 5 before the training course and 2.64 out of 5 after the training course. Wilcoxon signed rank test gives a p value of 0.008. Resident's perception of the usefulness of the laboratory evaluation was 3.94 out 5. There were 72.22% agreed that the laboratory is useful and 27.78% were neutral. The Z-score is −0.098 (means 0.098 standard deviations a score of 3.94 below the benchmark). The percentile rank is 53.90%. The coefficient of variation is 15.48%. Conclusions: Incorporating a multimedia cadaver laboratory into a residency education didactics curriculum was both feasible and beneficial for resident education. We demonstrate an improvement in knowledge and self efficacy/confidence following both cadaver laboratory courses.

AB - Objective: As operative experience in general surgery decreases and work hour limitations increase there is less exposure of surgical residents to advanced vascular and trauma exposures. Many institutions have demonstrated benefits of cadaver laboratory courses. We have incorporated a multimedia cadaver laboratory course into our general surgery residency didactics curriculum with the objective to demonstrate a benefit of the program as well as the feasibility of incorporation. Study Design: This is a prospective study at a tertiary care institution including general surgery residents within our residency program. A curriculum was designed, requiring residents to complete multimedia learning modules before both a trauma cadaver laboratory and vascular exposure cadaver laboratory. Outcome measures included self-efficacy/confidence (precourse and postcourse 5-point Likert surveys), knowledge (net performance on precourse and postcourse multiple choice examinations), and resident perception of the curriculum (postcourse 5-point Likert survey). Data were analyzed using ANOVA paired t-tests. Results: For the vascular cadaver laboratory, resident knowledge improved overall from an average of 41.2% to 50.0% of questions correct (p = 0.032) and self-efficacy/confidence improved by 0.59 from 1.52 to 2.11 out of 5 (p = 0.009). Median confidence is 1.37 out of 5 and 2.32 out of 5, before and after course, respectively. Wilcoxon nonparametric test reveals a p = 0.011. Resident's perception of the usefulness of the laboratory evaluation was 3.85 out 5. There were 85.71% agreed that the laboratory is useful and 14.29% were disagree. The Z-score is −0.1579 (means 0.1579 standard deviations a score of 3.85 below the benchmark). The percentile rank is 56.27%. The coefficient of variation is 24.68%. For the trauma cadaver laboratory, resident knowledge improved overall from an average of 55.89% to 66.17% of questions correct (p = 0.001) and self-efficacy/confidence improved by 0.75 from 1.68 out of 5 to 2.43 out of 5 (p = 0.011). Median confidence level is 1.41 out of 5 before the training course and 2.64 out of 5 after the training course. Wilcoxon signed rank test gives a p value of 0.008. Resident's perception of the usefulness of the laboratory evaluation was 3.94 out 5. There were 72.22% agreed that the laboratory is useful and 27.78% were neutral. The Z-score is −0.098 (means 0.098 standard deviations a score of 3.94 below the benchmark). The percentile rank is 53.90%. The coefficient of variation is 15.48%. Conclusions: Incorporating a multimedia cadaver laboratory into a residency education didactics curriculum was both feasible and beneficial for resident education. We demonstrate an improvement in knowledge and self efficacy/confidence following both cadaver laboratory courses.

KW - Medical Knowledge

KW - Patient Care

KW - Practice-Based Learning and Improvement

KW - cadaver laboratory

KW - surgery residency

KW - surgical resident education

KW - surgical simulation

KW - trauma simulation

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