Fertility biomarkers to estimate metabolic risks in women with polycystic ovary syndrome

Laura Detti, Heather E. Jeffries-Boyd, Lucy J. Williams, Michael Peter Diamond, Rebecca A. Uhlmann

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: We sought to evaluate the relationship between the polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS)-defining characteristics and the risk of developing metabolic complications in women presenting with complaints of infertility and/or menstrual irregularities and subsequently diagnosed with PCOS. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study. Women presenting with complaints of infertility and/or irregular menses and diagnosed with PCOS by the Rotterdam criteria, underwent endocrine, metabolic, and ultrasound assessment in the early follicular phase. Reproductive and metabolic parameters were included in regression analysis models with the PCOS-defining characteristics; ROC curves were calculated for the significant predictors. Results: Three hundred and seventy-four women with PCOS were included in our study. Oligo-anovulation, menstrual irregularities, and hirsutism were not predictive of any of the variables. Ovarian volume, follicle count, and biochemical hyperandrogenism were predictors for hormonal, metabolic, and endometrial complications. The relationships were independent of age and body mass index. ROC curves identified lower cut-off values of the PCOS-defining characteristics to predict patients’ risks of hyperinsulinemia, dyslipidemia, and glucose intolerance. Conclusions: Adverse metabolic effects of PCOS are already present in women at the time they present complaining of infertility and/or irregular menses. Hyperandrogenism and ultrasound can assist in predicting the patients’ concomitant metabolic abnormalities and can aid physicians in tailoring counseling for effective preventive strategies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1749-1756
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Assisted Reproduction and Genetics
Volume32
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2015

Fingerprint

Polycystic Ovary Syndrome
Fertility
Biomarkers
Infertility
Hyperandrogenism
Menstruation
ROC Curve
Anovulation
Hirsutism
Ovarian Follicle
Follicular Phase
Glucose Intolerance
Hyperinsulinism
Dyslipidemias
Counseling
Body Mass Index
Cross-Sectional Studies
Regression Analysis
Physicians

Keywords

  • Cross-sectional
  • Glucose intolerance
  • Hyperandrogenism
  • Hyperinsulinemia
  • Metabolic
  • PCOS

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Reproductive Medicine
  • Genetics
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology
  • Developmental Biology
  • Genetics(clinical)

Cite this

Fertility biomarkers to estimate metabolic risks in women with polycystic ovary syndrome. / Detti, Laura; Jeffries-Boyd, Heather E.; Williams, Lucy J.; Diamond, Michael Peter; Uhlmann, Rebecca A.

In: Journal of Assisted Reproduction and Genetics, Vol. 32, No. 12, 01.12.2015, p. 1749-1756.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Detti, Laura ; Jeffries-Boyd, Heather E. ; Williams, Lucy J. ; Diamond, Michael Peter ; Uhlmann, Rebecca A. / Fertility biomarkers to estimate metabolic risks in women with polycystic ovary syndrome. In: Journal of Assisted Reproduction and Genetics. 2015 ; Vol. 32, No. 12. pp. 1749-1756.
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