Fructose intolerance in IBS and utility of fructose-restricted diet

Young K. Choi, Nancy Kraft, Bridget Zimmerman, Michelle Jackson, Satish Sanku Chander Rao

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

78 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

INTRODUCTION: Whether dietary fructose intolerance causes symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is unclear. We examined the prevalence of fructose intolerance in IBS and long-term outcome of fructose-restricted diet. METHODS: Two hundred and nine patients with suspected IBS were retrospectively evaluated for organic illnesses. Patients with IBS (Rome II) and positive fructose breath test received instructions regarding fructose-restricted diet. One year later, their symptoms, compliance with, and effects of dietary modification on lifestyle were assessed using a structured interview. RESULTS: Eighty patients (m/f=26/54) fulfilled Rome II criteria. Of 80 patients, 31 (38%) had positive breath test. Of 31 patients, 26 (84%) participated in follow-up (mean=13 mo) evaluation. Of 26 patients, 14 (53%) were compliant with diet; mean compliance=71%. In this group, pain, belching, bloating, fullness, indigestion, and diarrhea improved (P<0.02). Of 26 patients, 12 (46%) were noncompliant, and their symptoms were unchanged, except belching. The mean impact on lifestyle, compliant versus noncompliant groups was 2.93 versus 2.57 (P>0.05). CONCLUSIONS: About one-third of patients with suspected IBS had fructose intolerance. When compliant, symptoms improved on fructose-restricted diet despite moderate impact on lifestyle; noncompliance was associated with persistent symptoms. Fructose intolerance is another jigsaw piece of the IBS puzzle that may respond to dietary modification.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)233-238
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Clinical Gastroenterology
Volume42
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2008
Externally publishedYes

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Fructose Intolerance
Irritable Bowel Syndrome
Fructose
Diet
Diet Therapy
Breath Tests
Life Style
Eructation
Dyspepsia
Diarrhea
Interviews
Pain

Keywords

  • Breath test
  • Diet
  • Fructose intolerance
  • IBS

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

Fructose intolerance in IBS and utility of fructose-restricted diet. / Choi, Young K.; Kraft, Nancy; Zimmerman, Bridget; Jackson, Michelle; Rao, Satish Sanku Chander.

In: Journal of Clinical Gastroenterology, Vol. 42, No. 3, 01.03.2008, p. 233-238.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Choi, Young K. ; Kraft, Nancy ; Zimmerman, Bridget ; Jackson, Michelle ; Rao, Satish Sanku Chander. / Fructose intolerance in IBS and utility of fructose-restricted diet. In: Journal of Clinical Gastroenterology. 2008 ; Vol. 42, No. 3. pp. 233-238.
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