Gender and Organizational Justice Preferences

Jody Clay-Warner, Elizabeth Culatta, Katie R. James

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Despite evidence that women and men possess similar workplace values, debate continues regarding gendered preferences for justice in the workplace. In particular, some have argued that women and men have fundamentally different justice orientations, which lead men to value fair outcomes and women to value fair procedures. Recent research finds that such beliefs may influence managers to reward men with greater monetary rewards than those provided to women. Here, we review this literature and argue that men and women do not have fundamentally different justice orientations. Instead, the few findings of gender difference in preferences for procedural vs. distributive justice in the workplace are a function of status differences between men and women.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1074-1084
Number of pages11
JournalSociology Compass
Volume7
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2013

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justice
gender
workplace
reward
Values
distributive justice
gender-specific factors
manager
evidence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Sciences(all)

Cite this

Gender and Organizational Justice Preferences. / Clay-Warner, Jody; Culatta, Elizabeth; James, Katie R.

In: Sociology Compass, Vol. 7, No. 12, 01.12.2013, p. 1074-1084.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Clay-Warner, Jody ; Culatta, Elizabeth ; James, Katie R. / Gender and Organizational Justice Preferences. In: Sociology Compass. 2013 ; Vol. 7, No. 12. pp. 1074-1084.
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