Gender Differences in Support for Torture

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Gender differences regarding support for the use of force average around 8 percent and are twice the size of differences on non-force issues. This article investigates a related gender gap in support for the use of torture. I investigate threat perceptions as a possible explanation for the gap and find strong support for this hypothesis. Specifically, increased threat perceptions lead men but not women to be more likely to support the use of torture. In addition to providing an explanation for the gender gap in support for torture, this extends prior work that finds increased threat perceptions with respect to terrorism lead to greater support for aggressive policies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)772-787
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Conflict Resolution
Volume61
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2017

Fingerprint

torture
gender-specific factors
threat
gender
terrorism
Torture
Gender differences
Threat perception
Gender gap

Keywords

  • counterterrorism
  • foreign policy
  • terrorism
  • use of force

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Business, Management and Accounting(all)
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Political Science and International Relations

Cite this

Gender Differences in Support for Torture. / Lizotte, Mary Kate.

In: Journal of Conflict Resolution, Vol. 61, No. 4, 01.04.2017, p. 772-787.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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