Genetic and environmental influences on blood pressure variability: A study in twins

Xiaojing Xu, Xiuhua Ding, Xinyan Zhang, Shaoyong Su, Frank A. Treiber, Robert Vlietinck, Robert Fagard, Catherine Derom, Marij Gielen, Ruth J.F. Loos, Harold Snieder, Xiaoling Wang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:: Blood pressure variability (BPV) and its reduction in response to antihypertensive treatment are predictors of clinical outcomes; however, little is known about its heritability. In this study, we examined the relative influence of genetic and environmental sources of variance of BPV and the extent to which it may depend on race or sex in young twins. METHODS:: Twins were enrolled from two studies. One study included 703 white twins (308 pairs and 87 singletons) aged 18-34 years, whereas another study included 242 white twins (108 pairs and 26 singletons) and 188 black twins (79 pairs and 30 singletons) aged 12-30 years. BPV was calculated from 24-h ambulatory blood pressure recording. RESULTS:: Twin modeling showed similar results in the separate analysis in both twin studies and in the meta-analysis. Familial aggregation was identified for SBP variability (SBPV) and DBP variability (DBPV) with genetic factors and common environmental factors together accounting for 18-40% and 23-31% of the total variance of SBPV and DBPV, respectively. Unique environmental factors were the largest contributor explaining up to 82-77% of the total variance of SBPV and DBPV. No sex or race difference in BPV variance components was observed. The results remained the same after adjustment for 24-h blood pressure levels. CONCLUSIONS:: The variance in BPV is predominantly determined by unique environment in youth and young adults, although familial aggregation due to additive genetic and/or common environment influences was also identified explaining about 25% of the variance in BPV.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)690-697
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of hypertension
Volume31
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2013

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Twin Studies
Blood Pressure
Antihypertensive Agents
Meta-Analysis
Young Adult

Keywords

  • blacks
  • blood pressure variability
  • heritability
  • meta-analysis
  • twin study

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine
  • Physiology
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Genetic and environmental influences on blood pressure variability : A study in twins. / Xu, Xiaojing; Ding, Xiuhua; Zhang, Xinyan; Su, Shaoyong; Treiber, Frank A.; Vlietinck, Robert; Fagard, Robert; Derom, Catherine; Gielen, Marij; Loos, Ruth J.F.; Snieder, Harold; Wang, Xiaoling.

In: Journal of hypertension, Vol. 31, No. 4, 01.04.2013, p. 690-697.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Xu, X, Ding, X, Zhang, X, Su, S, Treiber, FA, Vlietinck, R, Fagard, R, Derom, C, Gielen, M, Loos, RJF, Snieder, H & Wang, X 2013, 'Genetic and environmental influences on blood pressure variability: A study in twins', Journal of hypertension, vol. 31, no. 4, pp. 690-697. https://doi.org/10.1097/HJH.0b013e32835e2a4a
Xu, Xiaojing ; Ding, Xiuhua ; Zhang, Xinyan ; Su, Shaoyong ; Treiber, Frank A. ; Vlietinck, Robert ; Fagard, Robert ; Derom, Catherine ; Gielen, Marij ; Loos, Ruth J.F. ; Snieder, Harold ; Wang, Xiaoling. / Genetic and environmental influences on blood pressure variability : A study in twins. In: Journal of hypertension. 2013 ; Vol. 31, No. 4. pp. 690-697.
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abstract = "OBJECTIVES:: Blood pressure variability (BPV) and its reduction in response to antihypertensive treatment are predictors of clinical outcomes; however, little is known about its heritability. In this study, we examined the relative influence of genetic and environmental sources of variance of BPV and the extent to which it may depend on race or sex in young twins. METHODS:: Twins were enrolled from two studies. One study included 703 white twins (308 pairs and 87 singletons) aged 18-34 years, whereas another study included 242 white twins (108 pairs and 26 singletons) and 188 black twins (79 pairs and 30 singletons) aged 12-30 years. BPV was calculated from 24-h ambulatory blood pressure recording. RESULTS:: Twin modeling showed similar results in the separate analysis in both twin studies and in the meta-analysis. Familial aggregation was identified for SBP variability (SBPV) and DBP variability (DBPV) with genetic factors and common environmental factors together accounting for 18-40{\%} and 23-31{\%} of the total variance of SBPV and DBPV, respectively. Unique environmental factors were the largest contributor explaining up to 82-77{\%} of the total variance of SBPV and DBPV. No sex or race difference in BPV variance components was observed. The results remained the same after adjustment for 24-h blood pressure levels. CONCLUSIONS:: The variance in BPV is predominantly determined by unique environment in youth and young adults, although familial aggregation due to additive genetic and/or common environment influences was also identified explaining about 25{\%} of the variance in BPV.",
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T2 - A study in twins

AU - Xu, Xiaojing

AU - Ding, Xiuhua

AU - Zhang, Xinyan

AU - Su, Shaoyong

AU - Treiber, Frank A.

AU - Vlietinck, Robert

AU - Fagard, Robert

AU - Derom, Catherine

AU - Gielen, Marij

AU - Loos, Ruth J.F.

AU - Snieder, Harold

AU - Wang, Xiaoling

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N2 - OBJECTIVES:: Blood pressure variability (BPV) and its reduction in response to antihypertensive treatment are predictors of clinical outcomes; however, little is known about its heritability. In this study, we examined the relative influence of genetic and environmental sources of variance of BPV and the extent to which it may depend on race or sex in young twins. METHODS:: Twins were enrolled from two studies. One study included 703 white twins (308 pairs and 87 singletons) aged 18-34 years, whereas another study included 242 white twins (108 pairs and 26 singletons) and 188 black twins (79 pairs and 30 singletons) aged 12-30 years. BPV was calculated from 24-h ambulatory blood pressure recording. RESULTS:: Twin modeling showed similar results in the separate analysis in both twin studies and in the meta-analysis. Familial aggregation was identified for SBP variability (SBPV) and DBP variability (DBPV) with genetic factors and common environmental factors together accounting for 18-40% and 23-31% of the total variance of SBPV and DBPV, respectively. Unique environmental factors were the largest contributor explaining up to 82-77% of the total variance of SBPV and DBPV. No sex or race difference in BPV variance components was observed. The results remained the same after adjustment for 24-h blood pressure levels. CONCLUSIONS:: The variance in BPV is predominantly determined by unique environment in youth and young adults, although familial aggregation due to additive genetic and/or common environment influences was also identified explaining about 25% of the variance in BPV.

AB - OBJECTIVES:: Blood pressure variability (BPV) and its reduction in response to antihypertensive treatment are predictors of clinical outcomes; however, little is known about its heritability. In this study, we examined the relative influence of genetic and environmental sources of variance of BPV and the extent to which it may depend on race or sex in young twins. METHODS:: Twins were enrolled from two studies. One study included 703 white twins (308 pairs and 87 singletons) aged 18-34 years, whereas another study included 242 white twins (108 pairs and 26 singletons) and 188 black twins (79 pairs and 30 singletons) aged 12-30 years. BPV was calculated from 24-h ambulatory blood pressure recording. RESULTS:: Twin modeling showed similar results in the separate analysis in both twin studies and in the meta-analysis. Familial aggregation was identified for SBP variability (SBPV) and DBP variability (DBPV) with genetic factors and common environmental factors together accounting for 18-40% and 23-31% of the total variance of SBPV and DBPV, respectively. Unique environmental factors were the largest contributor explaining up to 82-77% of the total variance of SBPV and DBPV. No sex or race difference in BPV variance components was observed. The results remained the same after adjustment for 24-h blood pressure levels. CONCLUSIONS:: The variance in BPV is predominantly determined by unique environment in youth and young adults, although familial aggregation due to additive genetic and/or common environment influences was also identified explaining about 25% of the variance in BPV.

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KW - heritability

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