Genetic and Epigenetic Regulation of Aortic Aneurysms

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aneurysms are characterized by structural deterioration of the vascular wall leading to progressive dilatation and, potentially, rupture of the aorta. While aortic aneurysms often remain clinically silent, the morbidity and mortality associated with aneurysm expansion and rupture are considerable. Over 13,000 deaths annually in the United States are attributable to aortic aneurysm rupture with less than 1 in 3 persons with aortic aneurysm rupture surviving to surgical intervention. Environmental and epidemiologic risk factors including smoking, male gender, hypertension, older age, dyslipidemia, atherosclerosis, and family history are highly associated with abdominal aortic aneurysms, while heritable genetic mutations are commonly associated with aneurysms of the thoracic aorta. Similar to other forms of cardiovascular disease, family history, genetic variation, and heritable mutations modify the risk of aortic aneurysm formation and provide mechanistic insight into the pathogenesis of human aortic aneurysms. This review will examine the relationship between heritable genetic and epigenetic influences on thoracic and abdominal aortic aneurysm formation and rupture.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number7268521
JournalBioMed Research International
Volume2017
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2017

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Aortic Aneurysm
Epigenomics
Aortic Rupture
Aneurysm
Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm
Deterioration
Rupture
Epidemiologic Factors
Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm
Mutation
Dyslipidemias
Thoracic Aorta
Blood Vessels
Aorta
Dilatation
Atherosclerosis
Cardiovascular Diseases
Smoking
Hypertension
Morbidity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Immunology and Microbiology(all)

Cite this

Genetic and Epigenetic Regulation of Aortic Aneurysms. / Kim, Ha Won; Stansfield, Brian Kevin.

In: BioMed Research International, Vol. 2017, 7268521, 01.01.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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