Genetic overexpression of NR2B subunit enhances social recognition memory for different strains and species

Stephanie A. Jacobs, Joseph Zhuo Tsien

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The ability to learn and remember conspecifics is essential for the establishment and maintenance of social groups. Many animals, including humans, primates and rodents, depend on stable social relationships for survival. Social learning and social recognition have become emerging areas of interest for neuroscientists but are still not well understood. It has been established that several hormones play a role in the modulation of social recognition including estrogen, oxytocin and arginine vasopression. Relatively few studies have investigated how social recognition might be improved or enhanced. In this study, we investigate the role of the NMDA receptor in social recognition memory, specifically the consequences of altering the ratio of the NR2B:NR2A subunits in the forebrain regions in social behavior. We produced transgenic mice in which the NR2B subunit of the NMDA receptor was overexpressed postnatally in the excitatory neurons of the forebrain areas including the cortex, amygdala and hippocampus. We investigated the ability of both our transgenic animals and their wild-type littermate to learn and remember juvenile conspecifics using both 1-hr and 24-hr memory tests. Our experiments show that the wild-type animals and NR2B transgenic mice preformed similarly in the 1-hr test. However, transgenic mice showed better performances in 24-hr tests of recognizing animals of a different strain or animals of a different species. We conclude that NR2B overexpression in the forebrain enhances social recognition memory for different strains and animal species.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere36387
JournalPloS one
Volume7
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 27 2012

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Animals
Data storage equipment
Prosencephalon
Transgenic Mice
genetically modified organisms
brain
Aptitude
animals
mice
N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Receptors
transgenic animals
receptors
amygdala
animal tests
oxytocin
Vasotocin
hippocampus
social behavior
Genetically Modified Animals
Wild Animals

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

Cite this

Genetic overexpression of NR2B subunit enhances social recognition memory for different strains and species. / Jacobs, Stephanie A.; Tsien, Joseph Zhuo.

In: PloS one, Vol. 7, No. 4, e36387, 27.04.2012.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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