Green tea and the skin

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

197 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Plant extracts have been widely used as topical applications for wound-healing, anti-aging, and disease treatments. Examples of these include ginkgo biloba, echinacea, ginseng, grape seed, green tea, lemon, lavender, rosemary, thuja, sarsaparilla, soy, prickly pear, sagebrush, jojoba, aloe vera, allantoin, feverwort, bloodroot, apache plume, and papaya. These plants share a common character: they all produce flavonoid compounds with phenolic structures. These phytochemicals are highly reactive with other compounds, such as reactive oxygen species and biologic macromolecules, to neutralize free radicals or initiate biological effects. A short list of phenolic phytochemicals with promising properties to benefit human health includes a group of polyphenol compounds, called catechins, found in green tea. This article summarizes the findings of studies using green tea polyphenols as chemopreventive, natural healing, and anti-aging agents for human skin, and discusses possible mechanisms of action.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1049-1059
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of the American Academy of Dermatology
Volume52
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2005

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Tea
Phytochemicals
Polyphenols
Skin
Sanguinaria
Smilax
Thuja
Lavandula
Allantoin
Echinacea
Aloe
Carica
Artemisia
Ginkgo biloba
Pyrus
Panax
Catechin
Plant Extracts
Vitis
Insurance Benefits

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dermatology

Cite this

Green tea and the skin. / Hsu, Stephen.

In: Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology, Vol. 52, No. 6, 01.06.2005, p. 1049-1059.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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