Handgrip and sex-specific cardiometabolic risk factors in Hispanic/Latino migrant farmworkers

Anas Raed, Jessica Bilz, Miriam Cortez-Cooper, Lufei Young, Li Chen, Pamela Cromer, Haidong Zhu, Andrew Mazzoli, Samip Parikh, Jigar Bhagatwala, Yutong Dong, Zhuo Sun, Debbie Layman, Yanbin Dong

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Studies have suggested that handgrip strength might be a marker for cardiometabolic risk (CMR), but it has not been studied in Hispanic/Latino farmworker population. This study aimed to characterize absolute and relative handgrip strength in Hispanic/Latino farmworkers, and investigate the sex-specific association between handgrip strength and CMR factors. CMR factors and seated isometric absolute (the sum of both hands) and relative (absolute handgrip strength divided by body mass index) handgrip strengths were collected in 173 Hispanic/Latino farmworkers (mean age 35.1 ± 0.7 years; 49% female). The absolute and the relative handgrip strengths were 89.2 ± 1.8 kg, 3.3 ± 0.1 kg among males, and 56.5 ± 1.9 kg, 1.9 ± 0.1 kg among females, respectively. Age was correlated with absolute (r = - 0.17, p = 0.03) and relative handgrip strengths (r = - 0.28, p < 0.01). In males, absolute handgrip was related to triglycerides (r = - 0.25, p < 0.05), whereas relative handgrip was related to waist circumference (r = - 0.32, p < 0.01), waist/hip circumference ratio (r = - 0.36, p < 0.01), high-density lipoprotein (r = 0.24, p < 0.05), and triglycerides (r = - 0.35, p < 0.01). In females, absolute handgrip was related to fasting plasma glucose (r = - 0.28, p = 0.03), whereas relative handgrip was related to waist circumference (r = - 0.38, p < 0.01) and fasting plasma glucose (r = - 0.22, p < 0.05). Males had lower absolute handgrip strength when their triglycerides levels were at risk (p = 0.021), and lower relative handgrip strength when their plasma glucose (p = 0.034) and triglycerides (p = 0.002) levels were at risk. Females had lower relative handgrip strength when their plasma glucose (p = 0.001) and blood pressure (p = 0.004) were at risk. This study suggests that handgrip strength may be associated with sex-specific CMR factors in a Hispanic/Latino farmworker population.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)10272
JournalScientific reports
Volume11
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - May 13 2021

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Handgrip and sex-specific cardiometabolic risk factors in Hispanic/Latino migrant farmworkers'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this