Hardness, elasticity, and ultrastructure of bonded sound and caries-affected primary tooth dentin

Y. Hosoya, F. R. Tay

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Biomechanical properties of bonded dentin are important factors for resin restoration. We evaluated the hardness and elastic modulus of bonded sound and caries-affected primary tooth dentin using a one-step adhesive system, and observed the microstructure of the bonded interface. Six sound and six carious primary teeth were used. For sound teeth, flat occlusal dentin surfaces were prepared with a water-cooled high-speed diamond bur. For carious teeth, infected dentin was stained with a caries detector and removed with a water-cooled low-speed round steel bur and hand instruments. The prepared dentin was bonded with One-Up Bond F Plus (Tokuyama Dental Co., Tokyo, Japan). The resin-dentin interface and dentin beneath the interface were measured with a nano-indentation tester and observed with SEM and TEM. For both the carious and sound teeth, there was no significant difference between the hardness of the interfacial dentin and dentin 10-80 μm beneath the interface. However, the Young's modulus of the interfacial dentin was significantly lower than the dentin 40-80 μm (carious teeth) or 50-80 μm (sound teeth) beneath the interface. Both the hardness and Young's modulus of the interfacial dentin were not significantly different between the carious and sound teeth. Compared to the sound dentin, the hybrid layer on the caries-affected dentin was thicker and exhibited more complicated morphologic features. The thickness of the hybrid layers was generally less than 1 μm.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)135-141
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Biomedical Materials Research - Part B Applied Biomaterials
Volume81
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2007

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Deciduous Tooth
Elasticity
Hardness
Dentin
Acoustic waves
Tooth
Elastic moduli
Elastic Modulus
Resins
Diamond
Water
Steel
Nanoindentation
Restoration
Diamonds
Adhesives
Transmission electron microscopy
Detectors
Microstructure
Scanning electron microscopy

Keywords

  • Bonded dentin
  • Microstructures
  • Nano-hardness
  • Primary tooth
  • Young's modulus

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biomaterials
  • Biomedical Engineering

Cite this

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abstract = "Biomechanical properties of bonded dentin are important factors for resin restoration. We evaluated the hardness and elastic modulus of bonded sound and caries-affected primary tooth dentin using a one-step adhesive system, and observed the microstructure of the bonded interface. Six sound and six carious primary teeth were used. For sound teeth, flat occlusal dentin surfaces were prepared with a water-cooled high-speed diamond bur. For carious teeth, infected dentin was stained with a caries detector and removed with a water-cooled low-speed round steel bur and hand instruments. The prepared dentin was bonded with One-Up Bond F Plus (Tokuyama Dental Co., Tokyo, Japan). The resin-dentin interface and dentin beneath the interface were measured with a nano-indentation tester and observed with SEM and TEM. For both the carious and sound teeth, there was no significant difference between the hardness of the interfacial dentin and dentin 10-80 μm beneath the interface. However, the Young's modulus of the interfacial dentin was significantly lower than the dentin 40-80 μm (carious teeth) or 50-80 μm (sound teeth) beneath the interface. Both the hardness and Young's modulus of the interfacial dentin were not significantly different between the carious and sound teeth. Compared to the sound dentin, the hybrid layer on the caries-affected dentin was thicker and exhibited more complicated morphologic features. The thickness of the hybrid layers was generally less than 1 μm.",
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N2 - Biomechanical properties of bonded dentin are important factors for resin restoration. We evaluated the hardness and elastic modulus of bonded sound and caries-affected primary tooth dentin using a one-step adhesive system, and observed the microstructure of the bonded interface. Six sound and six carious primary teeth were used. For sound teeth, flat occlusal dentin surfaces were prepared with a water-cooled high-speed diamond bur. For carious teeth, infected dentin was stained with a caries detector and removed with a water-cooled low-speed round steel bur and hand instruments. The prepared dentin was bonded with One-Up Bond F Plus (Tokuyama Dental Co., Tokyo, Japan). The resin-dentin interface and dentin beneath the interface were measured with a nano-indentation tester and observed with SEM and TEM. For both the carious and sound teeth, there was no significant difference between the hardness of the interfacial dentin and dentin 10-80 μm beneath the interface. However, the Young's modulus of the interfacial dentin was significantly lower than the dentin 40-80 μm (carious teeth) or 50-80 μm (sound teeth) beneath the interface. Both the hardness and Young's modulus of the interfacial dentin were not significantly different between the carious and sound teeth. Compared to the sound dentin, the hybrid layer on the caries-affected dentin was thicker and exhibited more complicated morphologic features. The thickness of the hybrid layers was generally less than 1 μm.

AB - Biomechanical properties of bonded dentin are important factors for resin restoration. We evaluated the hardness and elastic modulus of bonded sound and caries-affected primary tooth dentin using a one-step adhesive system, and observed the microstructure of the bonded interface. Six sound and six carious primary teeth were used. For sound teeth, flat occlusal dentin surfaces were prepared with a water-cooled high-speed diamond bur. For carious teeth, infected dentin was stained with a caries detector and removed with a water-cooled low-speed round steel bur and hand instruments. The prepared dentin was bonded with One-Up Bond F Plus (Tokuyama Dental Co., Tokyo, Japan). The resin-dentin interface and dentin beneath the interface were measured with a nano-indentation tester and observed with SEM and TEM. For both the carious and sound teeth, there was no significant difference between the hardness of the interfacial dentin and dentin 10-80 μm beneath the interface. However, the Young's modulus of the interfacial dentin was significantly lower than the dentin 40-80 μm (carious teeth) or 50-80 μm (sound teeth) beneath the interface. Both the hardness and Young's modulus of the interfacial dentin were not significantly different between the carious and sound teeth. Compared to the sound dentin, the hybrid layer on the caries-affected dentin was thicker and exhibited more complicated morphologic features. The thickness of the hybrid layers was generally less than 1 μm.

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