Health care-related economic burden of the polycystic ovary syndrome during the reproductive life Span

Ricardo Azziz, Catherine Marin, Lalima Hoq, Enkhe Badamgarav, Paul Song

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

257 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Context: The polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is the most common endocrine abnormality of reproductive-aged women today, affecting approximately 6.6% of unselected reproductive-aged women (∼4 million women in the United States) (1990 National Institutes of Health criteria), and potentially represents a significant financial burden to our health care. Objective: The objective of the study was to define, using current definitions and prevalence or incidence data, the minimal economic burden that PCOS in reproductive-aged women represents for the United States. Design: The study design was a literature review. Setting: The study was conducted at a tertiary care center. Patients or Other Participants: There were no patients or other participants. Intervention(s): We performed a systematic review of the published medical literature to identify studies evaluating epidemiology of reproductive-age PCOS and its clinical consequences and costs. We tied general societal cost data for the different health consequences to reproductive-age PCOS costs, using prevalence data. Main Outcome Measure(s): The main measure in the study was total health care-related economic costs. Results: We estimated the mean annual cost of the initial evaluation to be $93 million (2.1% of total costs), that of hormonally treating menstrual dysfunction/abnormal uterine bleeding to be $1.35 billion (31.0% of total), that of providing infertility care to be $533 million (12.2% of total), that of PCOS-associated diabetes to be $1.77 billion (40.5% of total), and that of treating hirsutism to be $622 million (14.2% of total). Conclusions: The total cost of evaluating and providing care to reproductive-aged PCOS women in the United States is $4.36 billion. Because the cost of the diagnostic evaluation accounted for a relatively minor part of the total costs (approximately 2%), more widespread and liberal screening for the disorder appears be a cost-effective strategy, leading to earlier diagnosis and intervention and possibly the amelioration and prevention of serious sequelae.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)4650-4658
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism
Volume90
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2005

Fingerprint

Polycystic Ovary Syndrome
Health care
Economics
Delivery of Health Care
Costs and Cost Analysis
Costs
Health
Hirsutism
Epidemiology
Uterine Hemorrhage
National Institutes of Health (U.S.)
Medical problems
Tertiary Care Centers
Infertility
Early Diagnosis
Screening
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Biochemistry
  • Endocrinology
  • Clinical Biochemistry
  • Biochemistry, medical

Cite this

Health care-related economic burden of the polycystic ovary syndrome during the reproductive life Span. / Azziz, Ricardo; Marin, Catherine; Hoq, Lalima; Badamgarav, Enkhe; Song, Paul.

In: Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, Vol. 90, No. 8, 01.08.2005, p. 4650-4658.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Azziz, Ricardo ; Marin, Catherine ; Hoq, Lalima ; Badamgarav, Enkhe ; Song, Paul. / Health care-related economic burden of the polycystic ovary syndrome during the reproductive life Span. In: Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism. 2005 ; Vol. 90, No. 8. pp. 4650-4658.
@article{701ae98c59e847e7994eae9b57def02d,
title = "Health care-related economic burden of the polycystic ovary syndrome during the reproductive life Span",
abstract = "Context: The polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is the most common endocrine abnormality of reproductive-aged women today, affecting approximately 6.6{\%} of unselected reproductive-aged women (∼4 million women in the United States) (1990 National Institutes of Health criteria), and potentially represents a significant financial burden to our health care. Objective: The objective of the study was to define, using current definitions and prevalence or incidence data, the minimal economic burden that PCOS in reproductive-aged women represents for the United States. Design: The study design was a literature review. Setting: The study was conducted at a tertiary care center. Patients or Other Participants: There were no patients or other participants. Intervention(s): We performed a systematic review of the published medical literature to identify studies evaluating epidemiology of reproductive-age PCOS and its clinical consequences and costs. We tied general societal cost data for the different health consequences to reproductive-age PCOS costs, using prevalence data. Main Outcome Measure(s): The main measure in the study was total health care-related economic costs. Results: We estimated the mean annual cost of the initial evaluation to be $93 million (2.1{\%} of total costs), that of hormonally treating menstrual dysfunction/abnormal uterine bleeding to be $1.35 billion (31.0{\%} of total), that of providing infertility care to be $533 million (12.2{\%} of total), that of PCOS-associated diabetes to be $1.77 billion (40.5{\%} of total), and that of treating hirsutism to be $622 million (14.2{\%} of total). Conclusions: The total cost of evaluating and providing care to reproductive-aged PCOS women in the United States is $4.36 billion. Because the cost of the diagnostic evaluation accounted for a relatively minor part of the total costs (approximately 2{\%}), more widespread and liberal screening for the disorder appears be a cost-effective strategy, leading to earlier diagnosis and intervention and possibly the amelioration and prevention of serious sequelae.",
author = "Ricardo Azziz and Catherine Marin and Lalima Hoq and Enkhe Badamgarav and Paul Song",
year = "2005",
month = "8",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1210/jc.2005-0628",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "90",
pages = "4650--4658",
journal = "Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism",
issn = "0021-972X",
publisher = "The Endocrine Society",
number = "8",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Health care-related economic burden of the polycystic ovary syndrome during the reproductive life Span

AU - Azziz, Ricardo

AU - Marin, Catherine

AU - Hoq, Lalima

AU - Badamgarav, Enkhe

AU - Song, Paul

PY - 2005/8/1

Y1 - 2005/8/1

N2 - Context: The polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is the most common endocrine abnormality of reproductive-aged women today, affecting approximately 6.6% of unselected reproductive-aged women (∼4 million women in the United States) (1990 National Institutes of Health criteria), and potentially represents a significant financial burden to our health care. Objective: The objective of the study was to define, using current definitions and prevalence or incidence data, the minimal economic burden that PCOS in reproductive-aged women represents for the United States. Design: The study design was a literature review. Setting: The study was conducted at a tertiary care center. Patients or Other Participants: There were no patients or other participants. Intervention(s): We performed a systematic review of the published medical literature to identify studies evaluating epidemiology of reproductive-age PCOS and its clinical consequences and costs. We tied general societal cost data for the different health consequences to reproductive-age PCOS costs, using prevalence data. Main Outcome Measure(s): The main measure in the study was total health care-related economic costs. Results: We estimated the mean annual cost of the initial evaluation to be $93 million (2.1% of total costs), that of hormonally treating menstrual dysfunction/abnormal uterine bleeding to be $1.35 billion (31.0% of total), that of providing infertility care to be $533 million (12.2% of total), that of PCOS-associated diabetes to be $1.77 billion (40.5% of total), and that of treating hirsutism to be $622 million (14.2% of total). Conclusions: The total cost of evaluating and providing care to reproductive-aged PCOS women in the United States is $4.36 billion. Because the cost of the diagnostic evaluation accounted for a relatively minor part of the total costs (approximately 2%), more widespread and liberal screening for the disorder appears be a cost-effective strategy, leading to earlier diagnosis and intervention and possibly the amelioration and prevention of serious sequelae.

AB - Context: The polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is the most common endocrine abnormality of reproductive-aged women today, affecting approximately 6.6% of unselected reproductive-aged women (∼4 million women in the United States) (1990 National Institutes of Health criteria), and potentially represents a significant financial burden to our health care. Objective: The objective of the study was to define, using current definitions and prevalence or incidence data, the minimal economic burden that PCOS in reproductive-aged women represents for the United States. Design: The study design was a literature review. Setting: The study was conducted at a tertiary care center. Patients or Other Participants: There were no patients or other participants. Intervention(s): We performed a systematic review of the published medical literature to identify studies evaluating epidemiology of reproductive-age PCOS and its clinical consequences and costs. We tied general societal cost data for the different health consequences to reproductive-age PCOS costs, using prevalence data. Main Outcome Measure(s): The main measure in the study was total health care-related economic costs. Results: We estimated the mean annual cost of the initial evaluation to be $93 million (2.1% of total costs), that of hormonally treating menstrual dysfunction/abnormal uterine bleeding to be $1.35 billion (31.0% of total), that of providing infertility care to be $533 million (12.2% of total), that of PCOS-associated diabetes to be $1.77 billion (40.5% of total), and that of treating hirsutism to be $622 million (14.2% of total). Conclusions: The total cost of evaluating and providing care to reproductive-aged PCOS women in the United States is $4.36 billion. Because the cost of the diagnostic evaluation accounted for a relatively minor part of the total costs (approximately 2%), more widespread and liberal screening for the disorder appears be a cost-effective strategy, leading to earlier diagnosis and intervention and possibly the amelioration and prevention of serious sequelae.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=23844453653&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=23844453653&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1210/jc.2005-0628

DO - 10.1210/jc.2005-0628

M3 - Review article

C2 - 15944216

AN - SCOPUS:23844453653

VL - 90

SP - 4650

EP - 4658

JO - Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism

JF - Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism

SN - 0021-972X

IS - 8

ER -