Heat generation during implant drilling: The significance of motor speed

Mohamed Sharawy, Carl E. Misch, Norman Weller, Sherif Tehemar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

143 Scopus citations

Abstract

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to measure the heat generated from 3 drilling speeds (1,225, 1,667, and 2,500 rpm) using the armamentarium of 4 implant systems. Materials and Methods: The mean rise in temperature, the time of drilling, and the time needed for pig jaw bone to return to the baseline temperature were monitored using 4 thermocouple technology. Results: The mean rise in temperature, the time of drilling, and the time needed for the specimens to return to the baseline temperature were lower at 2,500 rpm than at 1,667 or 1,225 rpm (P ≤ .05), regardless of the system used. The rpm also directly correlated to the amount of time the bone remained at an elevated temperature. Conclusion: From a heat generation standpoint, we conclude that preparing an implant site at 2500 rpm could decrease the risk of osseous damage, which may affect the initial healing of dental implants. This may decrease the devital zone adjacent to an implant after surgery and be most advantageous in immediate load application to dental implants.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number00094
Pages (from-to)1160-1169
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery
Volume60
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2002

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Oral Surgery
  • Otorhinolaryngology

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