Heat generation during removal of an abutment screw fragment from dental implants

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Statement of problem: Little information is available on the effect of drilling speed on surrounding bone during the removal of an abutment screw fragment. Purpose: The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare, in vitro, the peak temperature increase during the removal of fractured abutment screws from implants placed in a porcine mandible, using drilling speeds of 600 or 2000 rpm. Material and methods: Twenty 4.3×13-mm dental implants were placed in 10 dissected porcine mandibles: 2 implants per mandible, 1 on each side. Localized defects were created in 20 surface-treated abutment screws, which were then tightened into each implant until a reproducible fracture occurred in each screw. The fractured screws were removed with a handpiece removal kit and irrigated with room-temperature water at either 600 or 2000 rpm. The temperature rise at the implant surface was measured at 3 levels with 3 type-K thermocouples. Repeated measure ANOVA was performed with the Tukey-Kramer post hoc test for mean pair-wise comparisons (α=.05 for all tests). Results: Mean peak temperatures were significantly higher at 2000 rpm than at 600 rpm in the mid-body (P<.001) and crestal (P=.003) regions but not in the apical (P=.225) implant locations. No significant differences in mean peak temperatures were found among the 3 locations using 600 rpm (P=.179). In the 2000-rpm group, mean peak temperature in the mid-body area was consistently higher than that in the apical (P<.001) area, and more instances of temperature rise above 56°C and 60°C were observed. In 1 implant from this group, the estimated peak temperature exceeded the bone damage threshold value (50°C for 30 seconds). Conclusions: A drilling speed of 2000 rpm during the removal of abutment screw fragments caused overheating of the outer surface of the implant which may damage the surrounding bone; a speed of 600 rpm appears to be safe.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)620-625
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Prosthetic Dentistry
Volume119
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2018

Fingerprint

Dental Implants
Hot Temperature
Temperature
Mandible
Bone and Bones
Swine
Analysis of Variance
Water

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oral Surgery

Cite this

Heat generation during removal of an abutment screw fragment from dental implants. / Arias, Sergio R.; Rueggeberg, Frederick; Mettenburg, Donald; Sharawy, Mohamed M.H.; Looney, Stephen Warwick; Elsayed, Ranya; Elsalanty, Mohammed Elsayed.

In: Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry, Vol. 119, No. 4, 01.04.2018, p. 620-625.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{4d49298612e248f29a3496f7529fd1c7,
title = "Heat generation during removal of an abutment screw fragment from dental implants",
abstract = "Statement of problem: Little information is available on the effect of drilling speed on surrounding bone during the removal of an abutment screw fragment. Purpose: The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare, in vitro, the peak temperature increase during the removal of fractured abutment screws from implants placed in a porcine mandible, using drilling speeds of 600 or 2000 rpm. Material and methods: Twenty 4.3×13-mm dental implants were placed in 10 dissected porcine mandibles: 2 implants per mandible, 1 on each side. Localized defects were created in 20 surface-treated abutment screws, which were then tightened into each implant until a reproducible fracture occurred in each screw. The fractured screws were removed with a handpiece removal kit and irrigated with room-temperature water at either 600 or 2000 rpm. The temperature rise at the implant surface was measured at 3 levels with 3 type-K thermocouples. Repeated measure ANOVA was performed with the Tukey-Kramer post hoc test for mean pair-wise comparisons (α=.05 for all tests). Results: Mean peak temperatures were significantly higher at 2000 rpm than at 600 rpm in the mid-body (P<.001) and crestal (P=.003) regions but not in the apical (P=.225) implant locations. No significant differences in mean peak temperatures were found among the 3 locations using 600 rpm (P=.179). In the 2000-rpm group, mean peak temperature in the mid-body area was consistently higher than that in the apical (P<.001) area, and more instances of temperature rise above 56°C and 60°C were observed. In 1 implant from this group, the estimated peak temperature exceeded the bone damage threshold value (50°C for 30 seconds). Conclusions: A drilling speed of 2000 rpm during the removal of abutment screw fragments caused overheating of the outer surface of the implant which may damage the surrounding bone; a speed of 600 rpm appears to be safe.",
author = "Arias, {Sergio R.} and Frederick Rueggeberg and Donald Mettenburg and Sharawy, {Mohamed M.H.} and Looney, {Stephen Warwick} and Ranya Elsayed and Elsalanty, {Mohammed Elsayed}",
year = "2018",
month = "4",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.prosdent.2017.06.011",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "119",
pages = "620--625",
journal = "Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry",
issn = "0022-3913",
publisher = "Mosby Inc.",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Heat generation during removal of an abutment screw fragment from dental implants

AU - Arias, Sergio R.

AU - Rueggeberg, Frederick

AU - Mettenburg, Donald

AU - Sharawy, Mohamed M.H.

AU - Looney, Stephen Warwick

AU - Elsayed, Ranya

AU - Elsalanty, Mohammed Elsayed

PY - 2018/4/1

Y1 - 2018/4/1

N2 - Statement of problem: Little information is available on the effect of drilling speed on surrounding bone during the removal of an abutment screw fragment. Purpose: The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare, in vitro, the peak temperature increase during the removal of fractured abutment screws from implants placed in a porcine mandible, using drilling speeds of 600 or 2000 rpm. Material and methods: Twenty 4.3×13-mm dental implants were placed in 10 dissected porcine mandibles: 2 implants per mandible, 1 on each side. Localized defects were created in 20 surface-treated abutment screws, which were then tightened into each implant until a reproducible fracture occurred in each screw. The fractured screws were removed with a handpiece removal kit and irrigated with room-temperature water at either 600 or 2000 rpm. The temperature rise at the implant surface was measured at 3 levels with 3 type-K thermocouples. Repeated measure ANOVA was performed with the Tukey-Kramer post hoc test for mean pair-wise comparisons (α=.05 for all tests). Results: Mean peak temperatures were significantly higher at 2000 rpm than at 600 rpm in the mid-body (P<.001) and crestal (P=.003) regions but not in the apical (P=.225) implant locations. No significant differences in mean peak temperatures were found among the 3 locations using 600 rpm (P=.179). In the 2000-rpm group, mean peak temperature in the mid-body area was consistently higher than that in the apical (P<.001) area, and more instances of temperature rise above 56°C and 60°C were observed. In 1 implant from this group, the estimated peak temperature exceeded the bone damage threshold value (50°C for 30 seconds). Conclusions: A drilling speed of 2000 rpm during the removal of abutment screw fragments caused overheating of the outer surface of the implant which may damage the surrounding bone; a speed of 600 rpm appears to be safe.

AB - Statement of problem: Little information is available on the effect of drilling speed on surrounding bone during the removal of an abutment screw fragment. Purpose: The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare, in vitro, the peak temperature increase during the removal of fractured abutment screws from implants placed in a porcine mandible, using drilling speeds of 600 or 2000 rpm. Material and methods: Twenty 4.3×13-mm dental implants were placed in 10 dissected porcine mandibles: 2 implants per mandible, 1 on each side. Localized defects were created in 20 surface-treated abutment screws, which were then tightened into each implant until a reproducible fracture occurred in each screw. The fractured screws were removed with a handpiece removal kit and irrigated with room-temperature water at either 600 or 2000 rpm. The temperature rise at the implant surface was measured at 3 levels with 3 type-K thermocouples. Repeated measure ANOVA was performed with the Tukey-Kramer post hoc test for mean pair-wise comparisons (α=.05 for all tests). Results: Mean peak temperatures were significantly higher at 2000 rpm than at 600 rpm in the mid-body (P<.001) and crestal (P=.003) regions but not in the apical (P=.225) implant locations. No significant differences in mean peak temperatures were found among the 3 locations using 600 rpm (P=.179). In the 2000-rpm group, mean peak temperature in the mid-body area was consistently higher than that in the apical (P<.001) area, and more instances of temperature rise above 56°C and 60°C were observed. In 1 implant from this group, the estimated peak temperature exceeded the bone damage threshold value (50°C for 30 seconds). Conclusions: A drilling speed of 2000 rpm during the removal of abutment screw fragments caused overheating of the outer surface of the implant which may damage the surrounding bone; a speed of 600 rpm appears to be safe.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85030025931&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85030025931&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.prosdent.2017.06.011

DO - 10.1016/j.prosdent.2017.06.011

M3 - Article

VL - 119

SP - 620

EP - 625

JO - Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry

JF - Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry

SN - 0022-3913

IS - 4

ER -