Heterogeneity in trauma registry data quality

Implications for regional and national performance improvement in trauma

GRIT Study Group

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background Led by the American College of Surgeons Trauma Quality Improvement Program, performance improvement efforts have expanded to regional and national levels. The American College of Surgeons Trauma Quality Improvement Program recommends 5 audit filters to identify records with erroneous data, and the Georgia Committee on Trauma instituted standardized audit filter analysis in all Level I and II trauma centers in the state. Study Design Audit filter reports were performed from July 2013 to September 2014. Records were reviewed to determine whether there was erroneous data abstraction. Percent yield was defined as number of errors divided by number of charts captured. Results Twelve centers submitted complete datasets. During 15 months, 21,115 patient records were subjected to analysis. Audit filter captured 2,901 (14%) records and review yielded 549 (2.5%) records with erroneous data. Audit filter 1 had the highest number of records identified and audit filter 3 had the highest percent yield. Individual center error rates ranged from 0.4% to 5.2%. When comparing quarters 1 and 2 with quarters 4 and 5, there were 7 of 12 centers with substantial decreases in error rates. The most common missed complications were pneumonia, urinary tract infection, and acute renal failure. The most common missed comorbidities were hypertension, diabetes, and substance abuse. Conclusions In Georgia, the prevalence of erroneous data in trauma registries varies among centers, leading to heterogeneity in data quality, and suggests that targeted educational opportunities exist at the institutional level. Standardized audit filter assessment improved data quality in the majority of participating centers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)288-295
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of the American College of Surgeons
Volume222
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2016

Fingerprint

Registries
Wounds and Injuries
Quality Improvement
Trauma Centers
Acute Kidney Injury
Urinary Tract Infections
Substance-Related Disorders
Comorbidity
Pneumonia
Hypertension
Data Accuracy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Heterogeneity in trauma registry data quality : Implications for regional and national performance improvement in trauma. / GRIT Study Group.

In: Journal of the American College of Surgeons, Vol. 222, No. 3, 01.03.2016, p. 288-295.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{ccfe69b8587941fa95b757896187f970,
title = "Heterogeneity in trauma registry data quality: Implications for regional and national performance improvement in trauma",
abstract = "Background Led by the American College of Surgeons Trauma Quality Improvement Program, performance improvement efforts have expanded to regional and national levels. The American College of Surgeons Trauma Quality Improvement Program recommends 5 audit filters to identify records with erroneous data, and the Georgia Committee on Trauma instituted standardized audit filter analysis in all Level I and II trauma centers in the state. Study Design Audit filter reports were performed from July 2013 to September 2014. Records were reviewed to determine whether there was erroneous data abstraction. Percent yield was defined as number of errors divided by number of charts captured. Results Twelve centers submitted complete datasets. During 15 months, 21,115 patient records were subjected to analysis. Audit filter captured 2,901 (14{\%}) records and review yielded 549 (2.5{\%}) records with erroneous data. Audit filter 1 had the highest number of records identified and audit filter 3 had the highest percent yield. Individual center error rates ranged from 0.4{\%} to 5.2{\%}. When comparing quarters 1 and 2 with quarters 4 and 5, there were 7 of 12 centers with substantial decreases in error rates. The most common missed complications were pneumonia, urinary tract infection, and acute renal failure. The most common missed comorbidities were hypertension, diabetes, and substance abuse. Conclusions In Georgia, the prevalence of erroneous data in trauma registries varies among centers, leading to heterogeneity in data quality, and suggests that targeted educational opportunities exist at the institutional level. Standardized audit filter assessment improved data quality in the majority of participating centers.",
author = "{GRIT Study Group} and Dente, {Christopher J.} and Ashley, {Dennis W.} and Dunne, {James R.} and Vernon Henderson and Ferdinand, {Colville Harvey Bernado} and Ferdinand, {Colville Harvey Bernado} and Romeo Massoud and John Adamski and Thomas Hawke and Mark Gravlee and John Cascone and Steven Paynter and Regina Medeiros and Elizabeth Atkins and Nicholas, {Jeffrey M.} and Dayna Vidal and Amina Bhatia and Karen Hill and Tracy Johns and Rochella Armola and James Patterson and Jo Roland and Thomas Hawk and Kathy Sego and John Bleacher and Scott Hannay and Ashley Forsythe and Clarence McKemie and Melissa Parris and Gina Solomon and Kim Brown and Jim Sargent and Laura Garlow and Angelina Postoev and Sabrina Westbrook and Robert Campbell and Leandrea Lopez and Kelly Mayfield and Tina Wood and Francisco Jacome and Allison Crosby and Michael Thompson and Joni Napier and John Sy and Lynnette McCall and Bruce Gioia and Gail Thornton and Dennis Spencer and Michelle Benton and Fred Mullins",
year = "2016",
month = "3",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.jamcollsurg.2015.11.035",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "222",
pages = "288--295",
journal = "Journal of the American College of Surgeons",
issn = "1072-7515",
publisher = "Elsevier Inc.",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Heterogeneity in trauma registry data quality

T2 - Implications for regional and national performance improvement in trauma

AU - GRIT Study Group

AU - Dente, Christopher J.

AU - Ashley, Dennis W.

AU - Dunne, James R.

AU - Henderson, Vernon

AU - Ferdinand, Colville Harvey Bernado

AU - Ferdinand, Colville Harvey Bernado

AU - Massoud, Romeo

AU - Adamski, John

AU - Hawke, Thomas

AU - Gravlee, Mark

AU - Cascone, John

AU - Paynter, Steven

AU - Medeiros, Regina

AU - Atkins, Elizabeth

AU - Nicholas, Jeffrey M.

AU - Vidal, Dayna

AU - Bhatia, Amina

AU - Hill, Karen

AU - Johns, Tracy

AU - Armola, Rochella

AU - Patterson, James

AU - Roland, Jo

AU - Hawk, Thomas

AU - Sego, Kathy

AU - Bleacher, John

AU - Hannay, Scott

AU - Forsythe, Ashley

AU - McKemie, Clarence

AU - Parris, Melissa

AU - Solomon, Gina

AU - Brown, Kim

AU - Sargent, Jim

AU - Garlow, Laura

AU - Postoev, Angelina

AU - Westbrook, Sabrina

AU - Campbell, Robert

AU - Lopez, Leandrea

AU - Mayfield, Kelly

AU - Wood, Tina

AU - Jacome, Francisco

AU - Crosby, Allison

AU - Thompson, Michael

AU - Napier, Joni

AU - Sy, John

AU - McCall, Lynnette

AU - Gioia, Bruce

AU - Thornton, Gail

AU - Spencer, Dennis

AU - Benton, Michelle

AU - Mullins, Fred

PY - 2016/3/1

Y1 - 2016/3/1

N2 - Background Led by the American College of Surgeons Trauma Quality Improvement Program, performance improvement efforts have expanded to regional and national levels. The American College of Surgeons Trauma Quality Improvement Program recommends 5 audit filters to identify records with erroneous data, and the Georgia Committee on Trauma instituted standardized audit filter analysis in all Level I and II trauma centers in the state. Study Design Audit filter reports were performed from July 2013 to September 2014. Records were reviewed to determine whether there was erroneous data abstraction. Percent yield was defined as number of errors divided by number of charts captured. Results Twelve centers submitted complete datasets. During 15 months, 21,115 patient records were subjected to analysis. Audit filter captured 2,901 (14%) records and review yielded 549 (2.5%) records with erroneous data. Audit filter 1 had the highest number of records identified and audit filter 3 had the highest percent yield. Individual center error rates ranged from 0.4% to 5.2%. When comparing quarters 1 and 2 with quarters 4 and 5, there were 7 of 12 centers with substantial decreases in error rates. The most common missed complications were pneumonia, urinary tract infection, and acute renal failure. The most common missed comorbidities were hypertension, diabetes, and substance abuse. Conclusions In Georgia, the prevalence of erroneous data in trauma registries varies among centers, leading to heterogeneity in data quality, and suggests that targeted educational opportunities exist at the institutional level. Standardized audit filter assessment improved data quality in the majority of participating centers.

AB - Background Led by the American College of Surgeons Trauma Quality Improvement Program, performance improvement efforts have expanded to regional and national levels. The American College of Surgeons Trauma Quality Improvement Program recommends 5 audit filters to identify records with erroneous data, and the Georgia Committee on Trauma instituted standardized audit filter analysis in all Level I and II trauma centers in the state. Study Design Audit filter reports were performed from July 2013 to September 2014. Records were reviewed to determine whether there was erroneous data abstraction. Percent yield was defined as number of errors divided by number of charts captured. Results Twelve centers submitted complete datasets. During 15 months, 21,115 patient records were subjected to analysis. Audit filter captured 2,901 (14%) records and review yielded 549 (2.5%) records with erroneous data. Audit filter 1 had the highest number of records identified and audit filter 3 had the highest percent yield. Individual center error rates ranged from 0.4% to 5.2%. When comparing quarters 1 and 2 with quarters 4 and 5, there were 7 of 12 centers with substantial decreases in error rates. The most common missed complications were pneumonia, urinary tract infection, and acute renal failure. The most common missed comorbidities were hypertension, diabetes, and substance abuse. Conclusions In Georgia, the prevalence of erroneous data in trauma registries varies among centers, leading to heterogeneity in data quality, and suggests that targeted educational opportunities exist at the institutional level. Standardized audit filter assessment improved data quality in the majority of participating centers.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84959513670&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84959513670&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.jamcollsurg.2015.11.035

DO - 10.1016/j.jamcollsurg.2015.11.035

M3 - Article

VL - 222

SP - 288

EP - 295

JO - Journal of the American College of Surgeons

JF - Journal of the American College of Surgeons

SN - 1072-7515

IS - 3

ER -