High‐voltage electron microscopy and conventional transmission electron microscopy of the interface zone between bone and endosteal dental implants

D. E. Steflik, A. L. Sisk, Gregory R Parr, Philip Jerry Hanes, F. Lake, M. J. Song, P. Brewer, R. V. McKinney

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

26 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The interface between mandibular bone and endosteal dental implants was examined with an in vivo dog model. Undecalcified mandibular implant samples were observed with both conventional transmission electron microscopy and highvoltage transmission electron microscopy (HVEM). Results demonstrated the variable nature of the interfacial support tissues. Mineralized bone was often found within 50 nm of the implant surface, separated from that surface only by an electron dense deposit. Osteocytes were observed close to the interface encased within lacunae extending numerous cellular processes through canaliculi. An osteoblast was also observed directly at the interface within a developing lacuna. Other interfacial areas exhibited a finely fibrillar and more electron lucent morphology. Furthermore, other areas were shown to be composed of wider zones of extracellular products containing collagen fibrils, ground substance, and calcified inclusions. Because bone is a n actively growing and remodeling tissue, these different morphological zones around the entire area of the implants would appear to confirm the dynamic tissue response to endosteal dental implants. Further, HVEM stereology was shown to be an exciting research tool to investigate this tissue response.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)529-545
Number of pages17
JournalJournal of Biomedical Materials Research
Volume26
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1992

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Dental prostheses
Dental Implants
Transmission Electron Microscopy
Electron microscopy
Electron Microscopy
Bone
Tissue
Transmission electron microscopy
Bone and Bones
Electrons
Osteocytes
Osteoblasts
Collagen
Deposits
Dogs
Research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biomaterials
  • Biomedical Engineering

Cite this

High‐voltage electron microscopy and conventional transmission electron microscopy of the interface zone between bone and endosteal dental implants. / Steflik, D. E.; Sisk, A. L.; Parr, Gregory R; Hanes, Philip Jerry; Lake, F.; Song, M. J.; Brewer, P.; McKinney, R. V.

In: Journal of Biomedical Materials Research, Vol. 26, No. 4, 01.01.1992, p. 529-545.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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