HTL1 encodes a novel factor that interacts with the RSC chromatin remodeling complex in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

Martin J. Romeo, Melinda L. Angus-Hill, Andrew K. Sobering, Yoshiaki Kamada, Bradley R. Cairns, David E. Levin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

24 Scopus citations

Abstract

RSC is an essential chromatin remodeling complex in Saccharomyces cerevisiae that performs central roles in transcriptional regulation and cell cycle progression. Here we identify Htl1 as a novel factor that associates with the RSC complex both physically and functionally. We isolated HTL1 through a genetic screen for mutants that displayed additive growth defects with a conditional mutation in the protein kinase C gene (PKC1), which has been suggested through genetic connections to interact functionally with RSC. Several lines of evidence connect HTL1 to RSC function. First, an htl1Δ mutant displayed temperature-sensitive growth and a G2/M cell cycle arrest at restrictive temperatures, a phenotype similar to that of strains with conditional mutations in essential RSC components. Second, we isolated RSC3, which encodes a component of the RSC complex, as a dosage suppressor of the htl1Δ growth arrest. Third, an htl1Δ mutant displayed additive growth defects with conditional rsc3 alleles. Fourth, overexpression of HTL1 suppressed the growth defect of a strain with a conditional mutation in another RSC component, RSC8. Finally, we demonstrate that Htl1 is a nuclear protein that can associate in vivo with a fraction of the RSC complex. We propose that an RSC-Htl1 complex acts coordinately with protein kinase C to regulate the G2/M transition.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)8165-8174
Number of pages10
JournalMolecular and Cellular Biology
Volume22
Issue number23
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2002
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Biology
  • Cell Biology

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