Idarubicin, cytarabine, and nivolumab in patients with newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukaemia or high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome: a single-arm, phase 2 study

Farhad Ravandi, Rita Assi, N. Daver, Christopher B. Benton, T. Kadia, Philip A. Thompson, Gautam Borthakur, Y. Alvarado, Elias J. Jabbour, Marina Konopleva, Koichi Takahashi, Steven Kornblau, Courtney D. DiNardo, Zeev Estrov, Wilmer Flores, Sreyashi Basu, J. Allison, Padmanee Sharma, Sherry Pierce, Allison PikeJorge E. Cortes, Guillermo Garcia-Manero, Hagop M. Kantarjian

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Abstract

Background: Outcomes for younger patients with acute myeloid leukaemia have moderately improved over the past two decades owing to better supportive care and recent introduction of novel targeted agents. Blocking PD-1 and its ligand's pathways enhances antileukaemia responses by enabling T cells in murine models. We aimed to assess the addition of nivolumab to frontline therapy with idarubicin and cytarabine in patients with newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukaemia or high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome. Methods: This single-arm, phase 2 part of the phase 1–2 study of nivolumab in combination with idarubicin and cytarabine was done at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center (Houston, TX, USA). Eligible patients were aged 18–60 years (or >60 years if suitable for intensive chemotherapy), and had newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukaemia or high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome, and an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status of 0–2. Induction included cytarabine 1·5 g/m2 by 24-h continuous infusion daily on days 1–4 (3 days in patients >60 years) and idarubicin 12 mg/m2 daily on days 1–3. Nivolumab 3 mg/kg was started on day 24 (range 22–26) and continued every 2 weeks for up to a year in responders. Responders received either up to five consolidation cycles of attenuated doses of idarubicin and cytarabine, or allogeneic stem cell transplantation if eligible. The primary endpoint was event-free survival. Efficacy and safety analyses were done in all patients who received at least one dose of study treatment. Secondary endpoints were relapse-free survival and overall survival. This ongoing trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT02464657. Findings: Between Aug 7, 2015, and June 2, 2018, 44 patients were enrolled of whom 22 (50%) had adverse genetic risk by European Leukaemia Network classification. All patients were evaluable for safety and efficacy. At a median follow-up of 17·25 months (IQR 0·50–30·40), median event-free survival was not reached (95% CI 7·93–NR). Median relapse-free survival of responders was 18·54 months (95% CI 8·20–23·22). The median overall survival was 18·54 months (95% CI 10·81–28·81). Six patients had seven grade 3–4 immune-related adverse events with two cases of rash, two of colitis, and one each of transaminitis, pancreatitis, and cholecystitis. 19 (43%) of 44 patients achieved a response and proceeded to allogeneic stem cell transplantation, with grade 3–4 graft-versus-host disease observed in five (26%). No treatment related deaths were attributed to nivolumab. Interpretation: Addition of nivolumab to induction chemotherapy with idarubicin and cytarabine is feasible in patients with newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukaemia or high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome. Post-transplant severe graft-versus-host disease could be improved, and earlier initiation of checkpoint inhibitor therapy is warranted in future studies. Funding: The MD Anderson Cancer Center Support Grant CA016672, and the MD Anderson Cancer Center Leukaemia SPORE CA100632 from the National Cancer Institute, Bristol Myers Squibb.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)e480-e488
JournalThe Lancet Haematology
Volume6
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2019

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hematology

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    Ravandi, F., Assi, R., Daver, N., Benton, C. B., Kadia, T., Thompson, P. A., Borthakur, G., Alvarado, Y., Jabbour, E. J., Konopleva, M., Takahashi, K., Kornblau, S., DiNardo, C. D., Estrov, Z., Flores, W., Basu, S., Allison, J., Sharma, P., Pierce, S., ... Kantarjian, H. M. (2019). Idarubicin, cytarabine, and nivolumab in patients with newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukaemia or high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome: a single-arm, phase 2 study. The Lancet Haematology, 6(9), e480-e488. https://doi.org/10.1016/S2352-3026(19)30114-0