Identification of Candida species by randomly amplified polymorphic DNA fingerprinting of colony lysates

Paul Steffan, Jose Antonio Vazquez, Dina Boikov, Chun Xu, Jack D. Sobel, Robert A. Akins

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

70 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We have characterized a method that produces simple yet diagnostic fingerprints that are unique to isolates of Candida species. DNA from individual colonies can be amplified from crude single-colony lysates. Randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) fingerprints generated from a single primer correctly identified the species of most (>98%) of the isolates identified with CHROMagar Candida plates as non-Candida albicans Candida species. RAPD fingerprints were much more informative than the plates, since they distinguished between all tested species and required less time. Most (91%) of these identifications agreed with those assigned by API 20C tests. In almost every incident of species identity mismatch, electrophoretic karyotyping showed that the RAPD fingerprint was correct. This underscores the improved objectivity and reliability of this method over those of conventional diagnostic tools. The identities of approximately 30% of C. albicans isolates identified in clinical laboratories by positive germ tube tests are not verified by either testing on CHROMagar Candida plates or RAPD fingerprinting. Data suggest that clinical isolates conventionally identified as C. albicans in clinical settings are heterogeneous, consisting of both misidentified and atypical yeasts. RAPD fingerprints obtained from primary culture plate colonies allows for rapid, highly accurate determinations of Candida species, hence permitting earlier selection of appropriate antifungal agents in the clinical setting.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2031-2039
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Clinical Microbiology
Volume35
Issue number8
StatePublished - Aug 1 1997
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

DNA Fingerprinting
Candida
Candida albicans
Karyotyping
Antifungal Agents
Dermatoglyphics
Yeasts
DNA

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology (medical)

Cite this

Identification of Candida species by randomly amplified polymorphic DNA fingerprinting of colony lysates. / Steffan, Paul; Vazquez, Jose Antonio; Boikov, Dina; Xu, Chun; Sobel, Jack D.; Akins, Robert A.

In: Journal of Clinical Microbiology, Vol. 35, No. 8, 01.08.1997, p. 2031-2039.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Steffan, Paul ; Vazquez, Jose Antonio ; Boikov, Dina ; Xu, Chun ; Sobel, Jack D. ; Akins, Robert A. / Identification of Candida species by randomly amplified polymorphic DNA fingerprinting of colony lysates. In: Journal of Clinical Microbiology. 1997 ; Vol. 35, No. 8. pp. 2031-2039.
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