Identification of vascular structures as a major source of signal contrast in high resolution 2D and 3D functional activation imaging of the motor cortex at l.5T preliminary results

S. Lai, A. L. Hopkins, E. M. Haacke, D. Li, B. A. Wasserman, P. Buckley, L. Friedman, H. Meltzer, P. Hedera, R. Friedland

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

306 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We have measured the T2* signal response associated with cortical activation due to finger motion at 1.5 Tesla. Both thin slice 2D and 3D images show signal intensity changes which vary from 2% to 32% depending on volunteer, echo time, slice thickness, and in‐plane resolution. The largest signal change occurred for the thinnest slices and highest resolution (2 mm3). This is consistent with reducing partial volume effects and a simple difference in phase between the intravascular signal and surrounding parenchyma. No inflow enhancement was seen on the 2D or 3D scans, confirming the nature of the signal difference for this approach was due to local field in‐homogeneity effects. Using 3D imaging, multiple effects can be seen simultaneously. With a 3D MRA method, it was possible to locate the vessel that was the source of the T2* behavior; it was in each case a vein on the surface of the cortical parenchyma.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)387-392
Number of pages6
JournalMagnetic Resonance in Medicine
Volume30
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1993

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Motor Cortex
Fingers
Blood Vessels
Volunteers
Veins

Keywords

  • MRA
  • fast MRI
  • functional MRI
  • perfusion

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

Cite this

Identification of vascular structures as a major source of signal contrast in high resolution 2D and 3D functional activation imaging of the motor cortex at l.5T preliminary results. / Lai, S.; Hopkins, A. L.; Haacke, E. M.; Li, D.; Wasserman, B. A.; Buckley, P.; Friedman, L.; Meltzer, H.; Hedera, P.; Friedland, R.

In: Magnetic Resonance in Medicine, Vol. 30, No. 3, 01.01.1993, p. 387-392.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lai, S. ; Hopkins, A. L. ; Haacke, E. M. ; Li, D. ; Wasserman, B. A. ; Buckley, P. ; Friedman, L. ; Meltzer, H. ; Hedera, P. ; Friedland, R. / Identification of vascular structures as a major source of signal contrast in high resolution 2D and 3D functional activation imaging of the motor cortex at l.5T preliminary results. In: Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. 1993 ; Vol. 30, No. 3. pp. 387-392.
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AU - Li, D.

AU - Wasserman, B. A.

AU - Buckley, P.

AU - Friedman, L.

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AU - Hedera, P.

AU - Friedland, R.

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