Immediate human pulp response to ethanol-wet bonding technique

Débora Lopes Salles Scheffel, Nancy Tomoko Sacono, Ana Paula Dias Ribeiro, Diana Gabriela Soares, Fernanda Gonçalves Basso, David Henry Pashley, Carlos Alberto De Souza Costa, Josimeri Hebling

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives To evaluate the short-term response of human pulps to ethanol-wet bonding technique. Methods Deep class V cavities were prepared on 17 sound premolars and divided into three groups. After acid-etching, the cavities from groups 1 (G1) and 2 (G2) were filled with 100% ethanol or distilled water, respectively, for 60 s before the application of Single Bond 2. In group 3 (G3, control), the cavity floor was lined with calcium hydroxide before etching and bonding. All cavities were restored with resin composite. Two teeth were used as intact control. The teeth were extracted 48 h after the clinical procedures. From each tooth serial sections were obtained and stained with haematoxylin and eosin (H/E) and Masson's trichrome. Bacteria microleakage was assessed using Brown & Brenn. All sections were blindly evaluated for five histological features. Results Mean remaining dentine thickness was 463 ± 65 μm (G1); 425 ± 184 μm (G2); and 348 ± 194 μm (G3). Similar pulp reactions followed ethanol- or water-wet bonding techniques. Slight inflammatory responses and disruption of the odontoblast layer related to the cavity floor were seen in all groups. Stained bacteria were not detected in any cavities. Normal pulp tissue was observed in G3 except for one case. Conclusions After 48 h, ethanol-wet bonding does not increase pulpal damage compared to water-wet bonding technique. Clinical significance Ethanol-wet bonding may increase resin-dentine bond durability. This study reported the in vivo response of human pulp tissue when 100% ethanol was applied previously to an etch-and-rinse simplified adhesive system.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)537-545
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Dentistry
Volume43
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2015

Fingerprint

Ethanol
Tooth
Dentin
Water
Odontoblasts
Bacteria
Calcium Hydroxide
Composite Resins
Bicuspid
Hematoxylin
Eosine Yellowish-(YS)
Adhesives
Acids

Keywords

  • Biocompatibility
  • Dental pulp
  • Dentine bonding agent
  • Ethanol

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dentistry(all)

Cite this

Salles Scheffel, D. L., Sacono, N. T., Dias Ribeiro, A. P., Soares, D. G., Basso, F. G., Pashley, D. H., ... Hebling, J. (2015). Immediate human pulp response to ethanol-wet bonding technique. Journal of Dentistry, 43(5), 537-545. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jdent.2015.02.014

Immediate human pulp response to ethanol-wet bonding technique. / Salles Scheffel, Débora Lopes; Sacono, Nancy Tomoko; Dias Ribeiro, Ana Paula; Soares, Diana Gabriela; Basso, Fernanda Gonçalves; Pashley, David Henry; De Souza Costa, Carlos Alberto; Hebling, Josimeri.

In: Journal of Dentistry, Vol. 43, No. 5, 01.05.2015, p. 537-545.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Salles Scheffel, DL, Sacono, NT, Dias Ribeiro, AP, Soares, DG, Basso, FG, Pashley, DH, De Souza Costa, CA & Hebling, J 2015, 'Immediate human pulp response to ethanol-wet bonding technique', Journal of Dentistry, vol. 43, no. 5, pp. 537-545. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jdent.2015.02.014
Salles Scheffel DL, Sacono NT, Dias Ribeiro AP, Soares DG, Basso FG, Pashley DH et al. Immediate human pulp response to ethanol-wet bonding technique. Journal of Dentistry. 2015 May 1;43(5):537-545. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jdent.2015.02.014
Salles Scheffel, Débora Lopes ; Sacono, Nancy Tomoko ; Dias Ribeiro, Ana Paula ; Soares, Diana Gabriela ; Basso, Fernanda Gonçalves ; Pashley, David Henry ; De Souza Costa, Carlos Alberto ; Hebling, Josimeri. / Immediate human pulp response to ethanol-wet bonding technique. In: Journal of Dentistry. 2015 ; Vol. 43, No. 5. pp. 537-545.
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abstract = "Objectives To evaluate the short-term response of human pulps to ethanol-wet bonding technique. Methods Deep class V cavities were prepared on 17 sound premolars and divided into three groups. After acid-etching, the cavities from groups 1 (G1) and 2 (G2) were filled with 100{\%} ethanol or distilled water, respectively, for 60 s before the application of Single Bond 2. In group 3 (G3, control), the cavity floor was lined with calcium hydroxide before etching and bonding. All cavities were restored with resin composite. Two teeth were used as intact control. The teeth were extracted 48 h after the clinical procedures. From each tooth serial sections were obtained and stained with haematoxylin and eosin (H/E) and Masson's trichrome. Bacteria microleakage was assessed using Brown & Brenn. All sections were blindly evaluated for five histological features. Results Mean remaining dentine thickness was 463 ± 65 μm (G1); 425 ± 184 μm (G2); and 348 ± 194 μm (G3). Similar pulp reactions followed ethanol- or water-wet bonding techniques. Slight inflammatory responses and disruption of the odontoblast layer related to the cavity floor were seen in all groups. Stained bacteria were not detected in any cavities. Normal pulp tissue was observed in G3 except for one case. Conclusions After 48 h, ethanol-wet bonding does not increase pulpal damage compared to water-wet bonding technique. Clinical significance Ethanol-wet bonding may increase resin-dentine bond durability. This study reported the in vivo response of human pulp tissue when 100{\%} ethanol was applied previously to an etch-and-rinse simplified adhesive system.",
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