Immediate Lower Extremity Tourniquet Application to Delay Onset of Reperfusion Injury after Prolonged Crush Injury

Daniel Stephen Schwartz, Zach Weisner, Jehangir Badar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Reperfusion after severe crush injury is an infrequent, but life-threatening condition. It is a unique aspect of prehospital medicine that occurs in the presence of emergency responders attempting to extricate and treat patients who have suffered a crushing injury. These events are unlikely to occur in the hospital setting and, as a result, remain poorly studied. Some evidence exists regarding prophylaxis, but the efficacy of these treatments has not been clearly established. The use of commercial tourniquets to delay the onset of reperfusion injury has previously been described in theory. Extensive literature now exists supporting the safety of tourniquet use in limb trauma and this potential life-saving measure requires further study in patients with crush injury. We present a case of prehospital tourniquet application to delay reperfusion injury after crush injury that resulted in a reduction in morbidity and complete limb salvage.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)544-547
Number of pages4
JournalPrehospital Emergency Care
Volume19
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Tourniquets
Reperfusion Injury
Lower Extremity
Emergency Responders
Limb Salvage
Wounds and Injuries
Reperfusion
Extremities
Medicine
Morbidity
Safety
Crush Injuries

Keywords

  • crush injury
  • prehospital
  • reperfusion injury
  • tourniquet

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Emergency Medicine
  • Emergency

Cite this

Immediate Lower Extremity Tourniquet Application to Delay Onset of Reperfusion Injury after Prolonged Crush Injury. / Schwartz, Daniel Stephen; Weisner, Zach; Badar, Jehangir.

In: Prehospital Emergency Care, Vol. 19, No. 4, 01.01.2015, p. 544-547.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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