Immunization of adolescents: Recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices, the American Academy of Pediatrics, the American Academy of Family Physicians, and the American Medical Association

N. A. Halsey, J. S. Abramson, P. J. Chesney, M. C. Fisher, M. A. Gerber, D. S. Gromisch, S. Kohl, S. M. Marcy, D. L. Murray, G. D. Overturf, R. J. Whitley, R. Yogev, G. Peter, C. B. Hall, B. Schwartz, R. Breiman, M. C. Hardegree, R. F. Jacobs, N. E. MacDonald, W. A. OrensteinN. R. Rabinowich

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

19 Scopus citations

Abstract

This report, concerning the immunization of adolescents (ie, persons 11 to 21 years old, as defined by the American Medical Association [AMA] and the American Academy of Pediatrics [AAP]), is a supplement to previous publications (ie, MMWR. 1994;43 [No. RR-1]1-38; the AAP 1994 Red Book: Report of the Committee on Infectious Diseases; Summary of Policy Recommendations for Periodic Health Examination, August 1996 from the American Academy of Family Physicians [AAFP]; and AMA Guidelines for Adolescent Preventive Services [GAPS]: Recommendations and Rationale). This report presents a new strategy to improve the delivery of vaccination services to adolescents and to integrate recommendations for vaccination with other preventive services provided to adolescents. This new strategy emphasizes vaccination of adolescents 11 to 12 years old by establishing a routine visit to their health-care providers. Specifically, the purposes of this visit are to a) vaccinate adolescents who have not been previously vaccinated with varicella virus vaccine, hepatitis B vaccine, or the second dose of the measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccine; b) provide a booster dose of tetanus and diphtheria toxoids; c) administer other vaccines that may be recommended for certain adolescents; and d) provide other recommended preventive services. The recommendations for vaccination of adolescents are based on new or current information for each vaccine. The most recent recommendations from the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP), AAP, AAFP, and AMA concerning specific vaccines and delivery of preventive services should be consulted for details (Exhibit 2).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)479-488
Number of pages10
JournalPediatrics
Volume99
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 1997

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

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    Halsey, N. A., Abramson, J. S., Chesney, P. J., Fisher, M. C., Gerber, M. A., Gromisch, D. S., Kohl, S., Marcy, S. M., Murray, D. L., Overturf, G. D., Whitley, R. J., Yogev, R., Peter, G., Hall, C. B., Schwartz, B., Breiman, R., Hardegree, M. C., Jacobs, R. F., MacDonald, N. E., ... Rabinowich, N. R. (1997). Immunization of adolescents: Recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices, the American Academy of Pediatrics, the American Academy of Family Physicians, and the American Medical Association. Pediatrics, 99(3), 479-488. https://doi.org/10.1542/peds.99.3.479