Impact of Intimate Partner Forced Sex on HIV Risk Factors in Physically Abused African American and African Caribbean Women

Jessica E. Draughon, Marguerite B. Lucea, Jacquelyn C. Campbell, Mary T. Paterno, Desiree R. Bertrand, Phyllis W. Sharps, Doris W. Campbell, Jamila K. Stockman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

We examined associations between intimate partner forced sex (IPFS) and HIV sexual risk behaviors among physically abused Black women. Women aged 18–55 in intimate relationships were interviewed in health clinics in Baltimore, MD and St. Thomas and St. Croix, US Virgin Islands (USVI). Of 426 physically abused women, 38 % experienced IPFS; (Baltimore = 44 and USVI = 116). USVI women experiencing IPFS were more likely to have 3+ past-year sex partners (AOR 2.06, 95 % CI 1.03–4.14), casual sex partners (AOR 2.71, 95 % CI 1.42–5.17), and concurrent sex partners (AOR 1.94, 95 % CI 1.01–3.73) compared to their counterparts. Baltimore women reporting IPFS were more likely to have exchanged sex (AOR 3.57, 95 % CI 1.19–10.75). Women experiencing IPFS were more likely to report their abuser having other sexual partners in Baltimore (AOR 3.30, 95 % CI 1.22–8.88) and USVI (AOR 2.03, 95 % CI 1.20–3.44). Clinicians should consider the influence of IPFS on individual and partnership HIV sexual risk behaviors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1313-1321
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Immigrant and Minority Health
Volume17
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 13 2015
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Forced sex
  • HIV/AIDS
  • Intimate partner violence
  • Sexual violence
  • Women

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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