Improving women's experience during speculum examinations at routine gynaecological visits: Randomised clinical trial

Dean A. Seehusen, Dawn R. Johnson, J. Scott Earwood, Sankar N. Sethuraman, Jamie Cornali, Kelly Gillespie, Maria Doria, Edwin Farnell IV, Jason Lanham

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

36 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: To determine if a standardised method of leg positioning without stirrups reduces the physical discomfort and sense of vulnerability and increases the sense of control among women undergoing speculum examination as part of a routine gynaecological examination. Design: Randomised clinical trial. Setting: Family medicine outpatient clinic. Patients: 197 adult women undergoing routine gynaecological examination and cervical smear. Intervention: Examination with or without stirrups. Main outcome measures: Women's perceived levels of physical discomfort, sense of vulnerability, and sense of control during the examination, measured on 100 mm visual analogue scales. Results: Women undergoing examination without stirrups had a reduction in mean sense of vulnerability from 23.6 to 13.1 (95% confidence interval of the difference -16.6 to -4.4). Mean physical discomfort was reduced from 30.4 to 17.2 (-19.7 to -6.8). There was no significant reduction in sense of loss of control. Conclusion: Women should be able to have gynaecological examinations without using stirrups to reduce the stress associated with speculum examinations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)171-173
Number of pages3
JournalBritish Medical Journal
Volume333
Issue number7560
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 22 2006

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Surgical Instruments
Randomized Controlled Trials
Gynecological Examination
Vaginal Smears
Ambulatory Care Facilities
Visual Analog Scale
Leg
Medicine
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Confidence Intervals

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Improving women's experience during speculum examinations at routine gynaecological visits : Randomised clinical trial. / Seehusen, Dean A.; Johnson, Dawn R.; Earwood, J. Scott; Sethuraman, Sankar N.; Cornali, Jamie; Gillespie, Kelly; Doria, Maria; Farnell IV, Edwin; Lanham, Jason.

In: British Medical Journal, Vol. 333, No. 7560, 22.07.2006, p. 171-173.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Seehusen, Dean A. ; Johnson, Dawn R. ; Earwood, J. Scott ; Sethuraman, Sankar N. ; Cornali, Jamie ; Gillespie, Kelly ; Doria, Maria ; Farnell IV, Edwin ; Lanham, Jason. / Improving women's experience during speculum examinations at routine gynaecological visits : Randomised clinical trial. In: British Medical Journal. 2006 ; Vol. 333, No. 7560. pp. 171-173.
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