In vivo optical reflectance measurement of human brain tissue with calculation of absorption and scattering coefficients

Maureen Johns, Cole A. Giller, Hanli Liu

Research output: Contribution to journalConference article

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Parkinson's disease is a neuro-degenerative disease affecting the globus pallidus (GP), a deep brain gray matter structure surrounded by white matter. During a pallidotomy a thin radio frequency probe is inserted into the GP to generate a small lesion. A fiber optic reflectance probe was developed and used during surgery. This instrument provides real-time display of the optical reflectance spectra as well as assisted lesion localization. Our 1.5-mm probe contains seven 100-μm fibers, one delivers light and six return the reflected light to a spectrometer. During clinical studies, the probe was placed against the surface of the brain and the spectrum between 350-850 nm was recorded. Measurements were repeated at 1-mm increments from the surface of the brain to 60-mm deep (GP level). This provided optical reflectance signals from both gray and white matter. Clinical results show that gray matter reflectance is approximately 50% of white matter between 650-800 nm. By calculating the slope between 700-850 nm, the signals can be differentiated between gray and white matter. We can quantify the absorption and scattering coefficients of the locally measured brain tissue by fitting the two-flux theory of Kubelka and Munk with our measurements.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)70-78
Number of pages9
JournalProceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering
Volume3595
StatePublished - Jan 1 1999
Externally publishedYes
EventProceedings of the 1999 Biomedical Diagnostic, Guidance, and Surgical-Assist Systems - San Jose, CA, USA
Duration: Jan 26 1999Jan 27 1999

Fingerprint

Reflectometers
scattering coefficients
Globus
Reflectance
brain
Brain
absorptivity
Probe
Absorption
Scattering
Tissue
reflectance
Coefficient
probes
Neurodegenerative diseases
Parkinson's Disease
lesions
Fiber Optics
Spectrometer
Parkinson disease

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering
  • Condensed Matter Physics

Cite this

In vivo optical reflectance measurement of human brain tissue with calculation of absorption and scattering coefficients. / Johns, Maureen; Giller, Cole A.; Liu, Hanli.

In: Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering, Vol. 3595, 01.01.1999, p. 70-78.

Research output: Contribution to journalConference article

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