Inattention and Hyperactivity in Children with Symptomatic and Asymptomatic Congenital Cytomegalovirus

Jonathan D. Topham, Jerry A. Miller, Garry W. Wright, Marie Turcich, Sherry S. Vinson, Isabella Iovino, Robert G. Voigt, Gail Demmler-Harrison

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objectives:To explore the relationship between congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) and inattention and hyperactivity among school-aged children. Methods: The Behavior Assessment System for Children, Second Edition, parent- and self-report, was completed among children with symptomatic congenital CMV (ScCMV) (n = 36), asymptomatic congenital CMV (AcCMV) (n = 76), and controls (n = 29) enrolled in a longitudinal cohort. The proportions of children with ScCMV, AcCMV, and controls with Attention Problems or Hyperactivity T-scores ever ≥ 65 were compared. Mean T-scores in these domains were also compared and adjusted for IQ. Results: Children with AcCMV did not differ from controls in the proportion of children with elevated Attention Problems or Hyperactivity T-scores or in mean Attention Problems or Hyperactivity T-scores. Children with ScCMV had a higher proportion of elevated Attention Problems T-scores compared with the AcCMV group but not controls. There were no differences in the proportions of children with elevated Hyperactivity T-scores between ScCMV and AcCMV or control groups. Children with ScCMV had higher mean Attention Problems T-scores versus those with AcCMV and controls and higher mean Hyperactivity T-scores versus those with AcCMV but not controls. After adjustment for IQ, differences in mean Attention Problems or Hyperactivity T-scores were no longer significant. Conclusion: Children with AcCMV are not at increased risk of inattention or hyperactivity compared with controls. However, our study suggests an increased prevalence of inattention and hyperactivity among children with ScCMV. Differences in IQ were confirmed to have a confounding effect. Evaluation for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder may be warranted in this population.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)743-750
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics
Volume40
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2019
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • ADHD
  • CMV
  • attention problems
  • hyperactivity
  • inattention

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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