Incidence of surgical site infections postcolorectal resections without preoperative mechanical or antibiotic bowel preparation

Drew D. Howard, Cassandra Quiana White, Tara R. Harden, C. Neal Ellis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study was performed to determine the incidence of surgical site infections (SSIs) after colorectal resection in patients without mechanical or antibiotic bowel preparation. A retrospective review of the medical records of 136 consecutive patients undergoing an elective colorectal resection between April 2004 and April 2006 was performed. Indications for colon resection in this series were malignant neoplasia (48%), inflammatory bowel disease (18%), diverticular disease (17%), or other benign disease (17%). Overall, an SSI occurred in 31 patients (23%). An SSI occurred in 16 of 90 patients (17.8%) who received antibiotics within 1 hour before surgery and in 15 of 46 patients (33.3%) who did not receive antibiotics in a timely manner (P < 0.05). An SSI occurred in seven of 15 patients (46.7%) who received bowel preparation but in only 24 of 121 patients (19.8%) who did not receive either mechanical or antibiotic bowel preparation (P < 0.029). SSIs were not associated with age, gender, diagnosis, length of procedure, preoperative steroid use, diabetes mellitus, or previous celiotomy. This series shows administration of perioperative antibiotics within 1 hour before surgery is associated with a significant decrease in the incidence of SSI and bowel preparation can be safely omitted.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)659-663
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Surgeon
Volume75
Issue number8
StatePublished - Aug 1 2009
Externally publishedYes

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Surgical Wound Infection
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Incidence
Preoperative Care
Medical Records
Diabetes Mellitus
Colon
Steroids

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Incidence of surgical site infections postcolorectal resections without preoperative mechanical or antibiotic bowel preparation. / Howard, Drew D.; White, Cassandra Quiana; Harden, Tara R.; Ellis, C. Neal.

In: American Surgeon, Vol. 75, No. 8, 01.08.2009, p. 659-663.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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