Increased Perfusion Pressure Drives Renal T-Cell Infiltration in the Dahl Salt-Sensitive Rat

Louise C. Evans, Galina Petrova, Theresa Kurth, Chun Yang, John D. Bukowy, David L. Mattson, Allen W. Cowley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Renal T-cell infiltration is a key component of salt-sensitive hypertension in Dahl salt-sensitive (SS) rats. Here, we use an electronic servo-control technique to determine the contribution of renal perfusion pressure to T-cell infiltration in the SS rat kidney. An aortic balloon occluder placed around the aorta between the renal arteries was used to maintain perfusion pressure to the left kidney at control levels, ≈128 mm Hg, during 7 days of salt-induced hypertension, whereas the right kidney was exposed to increased renal perfusion pressure that averaged 157±4 mm Hg by day 7 of high-salt diet. The number of infiltrating T cells was compared between the 2 kidneys. Renal T-cell infiltration was significantly blunted in the left servo-controlled kidney compared with the right uncontrolled kidney. The number of CD3+, CD3+CD4+, and CD3+CD8+ T cells were all significantly lower in the left servo-controlled kidney. This effect was not specific to T cells because CD45R+ (B cells) and CD11b/c+ (monocytes and macrophages) cell infiltrations were all exacerbated in the hypertensive kidneys. Increased renal perfusion pressure was also associated with augmented renal injury, with increased protein casts and glomerular damage in the hypertensive kidney. Levels of norepinephrine were comparable between the 2 kidneys, suggestive of equivalent sympathetic innervation. Renal infiltration of T cells was not reversed by the return of renal perfusion pressure to control levels after 7 days of salt-sensitive hypertension. We conclude that increased pressure contributes to the initiation of renal T-cell infiltration during the progression of salt-sensitive hypertension in SS rats.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)543-551
Number of pages9
JournalHypertension
Volume70
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2017

Fingerprint

Inbred Dahl Rats
Perfusion
T-Lymphocytes
Kidney
Pressure
Salts
Hypertension

Keywords

  • blood pressure
  • diet
  • immune system
  • lymphocytes
  • rats

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine

Cite this

Evans, L. C., Petrova, G., Kurth, T., Yang, C., Bukowy, J. D., Mattson, D. L., & Cowley, A. W. (2017). Increased Perfusion Pressure Drives Renal T-Cell Infiltration in the Dahl Salt-Sensitive Rat. Hypertension, 70(3), 543-551. https://doi.org/10.1161/HYPERTENSIONAHA.117.09208

Increased Perfusion Pressure Drives Renal T-Cell Infiltration in the Dahl Salt-Sensitive Rat. / Evans, Louise C.; Petrova, Galina; Kurth, Theresa; Yang, Chun; Bukowy, John D.; Mattson, David L.; Cowley, Allen W.

In: Hypertension, Vol. 70, No. 3, 01.09.2017, p. 543-551.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Evans, LC, Petrova, G, Kurth, T, Yang, C, Bukowy, JD, Mattson, DL & Cowley, AW 2017, 'Increased Perfusion Pressure Drives Renal T-Cell Infiltration in the Dahl Salt-Sensitive Rat', Hypertension, vol. 70, no. 3, pp. 543-551. https://doi.org/10.1161/HYPERTENSIONAHA.117.09208
Evans, Louise C. ; Petrova, Galina ; Kurth, Theresa ; Yang, Chun ; Bukowy, John D. ; Mattson, David L. ; Cowley, Allen W. / Increased Perfusion Pressure Drives Renal T-Cell Infiltration in the Dahl Salt-Sensitive Rat. In: Hypertension. 2017 ; Vol. 70, No. 3. pp. 543-551.
@article{1cab7538af5d4f88822da2c266f8ecc8,
title = "Increased Perfusion Pressure Drives Renal T-Cell Infiltration in the Dahl Salt-Sensitive Rat",
abstract = "Renal T-cell infiltration is a key component of salt-sensitive hypertension in Dahl salt-sensitive (SS) rats. Here, we use an electronic servo-control technique to determine the contribution of renal perfusion pressure to T-cell infiltration in the SS rat kidney. An aortic balloon occluder placed around the aorta between the renal arteries was used to maintain perfusion pressure to the left kidney at control levels, ≈128 mm Hg, during 7 days of salt-induced hypertension, whereas the right kidney was exposed to increased renal perfusion pressure that averaged 157±4 mm Hg by day 7 of high-salt diet. The number of infiltrating T cells was compared between the 2 kidneys. Renal T-cell infiltration was significantly blunted in the left servo-controlled kidney compared with the right uncontrolled kidney. The number of CD3+, CD3+CD4+, and CD3+CD8+ T cells were all significantly lower in the left servo-controlled kidney. This effect was not specific to T cells because CD45R+ (B cells) and CD11b/c+ (monocytes and macrophages) cell infiltrations were all exacerbated in the hypertensive kidneys. Increased renal perfusion pressure was also associated with augmented renal injury, with increased protein casts and glomerular damage in the hypertensive kidney. Levels of norepinephrine were comparable between the 2 kidneys, suggestive of equivalent sympathetic innervation. Renal infiltration of T cells was not reversed by the return of renal perfusion pressure to control levels after 7 days of salt-sensitive hypertension. We conclude that increased pressure contributes to the initiation of renal T-cell infiltration during the progression of salt-sensitive hypertension in SS rats.",
keywords = "blood pressure, diet, immune system, lymphocytes, rats",
author = "Evans, {Louise C.} and Galina Petrova and Theresa Kurth and Chun Yang and Bukowy, {John D.} and Mattson, {David L.} and Cowley, {Allen W.}",
year = "2017",
month = "9",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1161/HYPERTENSIONAHA.117.09208",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "70",
pages = "543--551",
journal = "Hypertension",
issn = "0194-911X",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Increased Perfusion Pressure Drives Renal T-Cell Infiltration in the Dahl Salt-Sensitive Rat

AU - Evans, Louise C.

AU - Petrova, Galina

AU - Kurth, Theresa

AU - Yang, Chun

AU - Bukowy, John D.

AU - Mattson, David L.

AU - Cowley, Allen W.

PY - 2017/9/1

Y1 - 2017/9/1

N2 - Renal T-cell infiltration is a key component of salt-sensitive hypertension in Dahl salt-sensitive (SS) rats. Here, we use an electronic servo-control technique to determine the contribution of renal perfusion pressure to T-cell infiltration in the SS rat kidney. An aortic balloon occluder placed around the aorta between the renal arteries was used to maintain perfusion pressure to the left kidney at control levels, ≈128 mm Hg, during 7 days of salt-induced hypertension, whereas the right kidney was exposed to increased renal perfusion pressure that averaged 157±4 mm Hg by day 7 of high-salt diet. The number of infiltrating T cells was compared between the 2 kidneys. Renal T-cell infiltration was significantly blunted in the left servo-controlled kidney compared with the right uncontrolled kidney. The number of CD3+, CD3+CD4+, and CD3+CD8+ T cells were all significantly lower in the left servo-controlled kidney. This effect was not specific to T cells because CD45R+ (B cells) and CD11b/c+ (monocytes and macrophages) cell infiltrations were all exacerbated in the hypertensive kidneys. Increased renal perfusion pressure was also associated with augmented renal injury, with increased protein casts and glomerular damage in the hypertensive kidney. Levels of norepinephrine were comparable between the 2 kidneys, suggestive of equivalent sympathetic innervation. Renal infiltration of T cells was not reversed by the return of renal perfusion pressure to control levels after 7 days of salt-sensitive hypertension. We conclude that increased pressure contributes to the initiation of renal T-cell infiltration during the progression of salt-sensitive hypertension in SS rats.

AB - Renal T-cell infiltration is a key component of salt-sensitive hypertension in Dahl salt-sensitive (SS) rats. Here, we use an electronic servo-control technique to determine the contribution of renal perfusion pressure to T-cell infiltration in the SS rat kidney. An aortic balloon occluder placed around the aorta between the renal arteries was used to maintain perfusion pressure to the left kidney at control levels, ≈128 mm Hg, during 7 days of salt-induced hypertension, whereas the right kidney was exposed to increased renal perfusion pressure that averaged 157±4 mm Hg by day 7 of high-salt diet. The number of infiltrating T cells was compared between the 2 kidneys. Renal T-cell infiltration was significantly blunted in the left servo-controlled kidney compared with the right uncontrolled kidney. The number of CD3+, CD3+CD4+, and CD3+CD8+ T cells were all significantly lower in the left servo-controlled kidney. This effect was not specific to T cells because CD45R+ (B cells) and CD11b/c+ (monocytes and macrophages) cell infiltrations were all exacerbated in the hypertensive kidneys. Increased renal perfusion pressure was also associated with augmented renal injury, with increased protein casts and glomerular damage in the hypertensive kidney. Levels of norepinephrine were comparable between the 2 kidneys, suggestive of equivalent sympathetic innervation. Renal infiltration of T cells was not reversed by the return of renal perfusion pressure to control levels after 7 days of salt-sensitive hypertension. We conclude that increased pressure contributes to the initiation of renal T-cell infiltration during the progression of salt-sensitive hypertension in SS rats.

KW - blood pressure

KW - diet

KW - immune system

KW - lymphocytes

KW - rats

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85023160842&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85023160842&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1161/HYPERTENSIONAHA.117.09208

DO - 10.1161/HYPERTENSIONAHA.117.09208

M3 - Article

C2 - 28696224

AN - SCOPUS:85023160842

VL - 70

SP - 543

EP - 551

JO - Hypertension

JF - Hypertension

SN - 0194-911X

IS - 3

ER -