Increased vascular density and vitreo-retinal membranes accompany vascularization of the pigment epithelium in the dystrophic rat retina

Ruth B Caldwell, R. S. Roque, S. W. Solomon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Observations of vascularization of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and formation of vitreo-retinal membranes (VRMs) in Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) rats with inherited retinal dystrophy suggest that vascular proliferation occurs in this model. To test this hypothesis, we studied the progression of vascular changes in RCS and age-matched control rats using quantitative light microscope morphometry and electron microscopy. At 2 weeks, prior to photoreceptor degeneration, the dystrophic retina is comparable with the control. By 2 months, extensive degeneration of photoreceptor cells results in significant thinning of the dystrophic retina as compared with the control. Signs of vascular degeneration are evident at the electron microscope level - 'ghost' vessels consisting of acellular basal lamina surrounded by amorphous electron-dense material; degenerating endothelial cells and pericytes; and abnormal deposits of extracellular matrix (ECM) material around blood vessels. Vascular degeneration is accompanied by glial changes in the form of necrotic perivascular glial processes and abnormal ECM deposits among the altered Muller cell processes. At 2-4 months in the dystrophic retina, numbers of vessel profiles in dystrophic retinas are decreased as compared with controls. However, vascular degeneration is overshadowed by the formation of numerous capillary tufts within the RPE layer, which together with retinal thinning results in increased vessel density. Between 4-12 months, the retinal thickness diminishes further, vascularization of the RPE increases, vitreo-retinal membranes are formed, and vascular density increases. In summary, following an initial period of vascular degeneration, vascularization of the RPE is accompanied by an increase in retinal vessel density and by the formation of vitreo-retinal membranes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)923-937
Number of pages15
JournalCurrent Eye Research
Volume8
Issue number9
StatePublished - Jan 1 1989

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Blood Vessels
Retina
Epithelium
Membranes
Retinal Pigment Epithelium
Neuroglia
Extracellular Matrix
Retinal Dystrophies
Electrons
Ependymoglial Cells
Retinal Vessels
Pericytes
Photoreceptor Cells
Basement Membrane
Electron Microscopy
Endothelial Cells
Light

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology
  • Sensory Systems
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience

Cite this

Increased vascular density and vitreo-retinal membranes accompany vascularization of the pigment epithelium in the dystrophic rat retina. / Caldwell, Ruth B; Roque, R. S.; Solomon, S. W.

In: Current Eye Research, Vol. 8, No. 9, 01.01.1989, p. 923-937.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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