Increasing organ donation after cardiac death in trauma patients Presented at the 73rd Annual Meeting of the American Association for the Surgery of Trauma, September 10-13, 2014, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Bellal Joseph, Mazhar Khalil, Viraj Pandit, Tahereh Orouji Jokar, Ali Cheaito, Narong Kulvatunyou, Andrew Tang, Terence OKeeffe, Gary Vercruysse, Donald J. Green, Randall S. Friese, Peter Rhee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background Organ donation after cardiac death (DCD) is not optimal but still remains a valuable source of organ donation in trauma donors. The aim of this study was to assess national trends in DCD from trauma patients. Methods A 12-year (2002 to 2013) retrospective analysis of the United Network for Organ Sharing database was performed. Outcome measures were the following: proportion of DCD donors over the years and number and type of solid organs donated. Results DCD resulted in procurement of 16,248 solid organs from 8,724 donors. The number of organs donated per donor remained unchanged over the study period (P =.1). DCD increased significantly from 3.1% in 2002 to 14.6% in 2013 (P =.001). There was a significant increase in the proportion of kidney (2002: 3.4% vs 2013: 16.3%, P =.001) and liver (2002: 1.6% vs 2013: 5%, P =.041) donation among DCD donors over the study period. Conclusions DCD from trauma donors provides a significant source of solid organs. The proportion of DCD donors increased significantly over the last 12 years.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)468-472
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Surgery
Volume210
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Donation after cardiac death
  • Donation after circulatory collapse
  • Organ donation
  • Trauma donors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

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