Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Neural Stem Cell Therapy Enhances Recovery in an Ischemic Stroke Pig Model

Emily W. Baker, Simon R. Platt, Vivian W. Lau, Harrison E. Grace, Shannon P. Holmes, Liya Wang, Kylee Jo Duberstein, Elizabeth W. Howerth, Holly A. Kinder, Steve L. Stice, David C Hess, Hui Mao, Franklin D. West

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neural stem cells (iNSCs) have significant potential as an autologous, multifunctional cell therapy for stroke, which is the primary cause of long term disability in the United States and the second leading cause of death worldwide. Here we show that iNSC transplantation improves recovery through neuroprotective, regenerative, and cell replacement mechanisms in a novel ischemic pig stroke model. Longitudinal multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) following iNSC therapy demonstrated reduced changes in white matter integrity, cerebral blood perfusion, and brain metabolism in the infarcted tissue. The observed tissue level recovery strongly correlated with decreased immune response, enhanced neuronal protection, and increased neurogenesis. iNSCs differentiated into neurons and oligodendrocytes with indication of long term integration. The robust recovery response to iNSC therapy in a translational pig stroke model with increased predictive potential strongly supports that iNSCs may be the critically needed therapeutic for human stroke patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number10075
JournalScientific Reports
Volume7
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2017

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Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells
Neural Stem Cells
Cell- and Tissue-Based Therapy
Swine
Stroke
Neurogenesis
Oligodendroglia
Cause of Death
Therapeutics
Perfusion
Transplantation
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Neurons
Brain

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

Cite this

Baker, E. W., Platt, S. R., Lau, V. W., Grace, H. E., Holmes, S. P., Wang, L., ... West, F. D. (2017). Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Neural Stem Cell Therapy Enhances Recovery in an Ischemic Stroke Pig Model. Scientific Reports, 7(1), [10075]. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-017-10406-x

Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Neural Stem Cell Therapy Enhances Recovery in an Ischemic Stroke Pig Model. / Baker, Emily W.; Platt, Simon R.; Lau, Vivian W.; Grace, Harrison E.; Holmes, Shannon P.; Wang, Liya; Duberstein, Kylee Jo; Howerth, Elizabeth W.; Kinder, Holly A.; Stice, Steve L.; Hess, David C; Mao, Hui; West, Franklin D.

In: Scientific Reports, Vol. 7, No. 1, 10075, 01.12.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Baker, EW, Platt, SR, Lau, VW, Grace, HE, Holmes, SP, Wang, L, Duberstein, KJ, Howerth, EW, Kinder, HA, Stice, SL, Hess, DC, Mao, H & West, FD 2017, 'Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Neural Stem Cell Therapy Enhances Recovery in an Ischemic Stroke Pig Model', Scientific Reports, vol. 7, no. 1, 10075. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-017-10406-x
Baker, Emily W. ; Platt, Simon R. ; Lau, Vivian W. ; Grace, Harrison E. ; Holmes, Shannon P. ; Wang, Liya ; Duberstein, Kylee Jo ; Howerth, Elizabeth W. ; Kinder, Holly A. ; Stice, Steve L. ; Hess, David C ; Mao, Hui ; West, Franklin D. / Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Neural Stem Cell Therapy Enhances Recovery in an Ischemic Stroke Pig Model. In: Scientific Reports. 2017 ; Vol. 7, No. 1.
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