Infection and nonunion after fasciotomy for compartment syndrome associated with tibia fractures: A matched cohort comparison

James A. Blair, Thomas Kyle Stoops, Michael C. Doarn, Dan Kemper, Murat Erdogan, Rebecca Griffing, H. Claude Sagi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objectives: The objective was to compare the rates of union and infection in patients treated with and without fasciotomy for acute compartment syndrome (ACS) in operatively managed tibia fractures. Design: This was a retrospective review. Setting: The study was conducted at both a Level 1 and Level II trauma center. Patients/Participants: Patients operated for tibial plateau fractures (group 1) and tibial shaft fractures (group 3) with ACS requiring fasciotomy were matched to patients without ACS (plateau: group 2, shaft: group 4) in a 1:3 ratio for age, sex, fracture pattern, and open/closed injury. Intervention: Surgical treatment was provided with plates/screws (plateau fractures) or intramedullary rod (shaft fractures). Patients with ACS were treated with a 2-incision 4-compartment fasciotomy. Main Outcome Measurements: Time to union and incidence of deep infection, nonunion, and delayed union. Results: One hundred eighty-four patients were included-group 1: 23 patients, group 2: 69 patients, group 3: 23 patients, and group 4: 69 patients. Time to union averaged 26.8 weeks for groups 1 and 3 and 21.5 weeks for groups 2 and 4 (P > 0.05). Nonunion occurred in 20% for groups 1 and 3 and in 5% for groups 2 and 4 (P = 0.003). Deep infection developed in 20% for groups 1 and 3 and in 4% for groups 2 and 4 (P = 0.001). There was a significant increase in infection in group 1 versus group 2 and nonunion in group 3 versus group 4. There were significantly more smokers for those with fasciotomies (46%) than without (20%, P < 0.001), though all statistical results remained similar after a binary regression analysis. Conclusion: Four-compartment fasciotomies in patients with tibial shaft or plateau fractures is associated with a significant increase in infection and nonunion.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)392-396
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Orthopaedic Trauma
Volume30
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2016
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Compartment syndrome
  • Fasciotomy
  • Infection
  • Nonunion
  • Tibia fracture

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

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