Influence of barometric pressure on interleukin-1β secretion

William J. Becker, Joseph Gerard Cannon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Monocytes and macrophages are activated by various environmental challenges, including microorganisms, radiation, and pollutants. These cells release cytokines, such as interleukin (IL)-1β, that mediate physiological adaptations to stress. This study sought to define further the role of IL-1β in general adaptation to environmental stress by testing the hypothesis that high altitude (20,000 ft, 6,096 m) would stimulate IL-1β secretion from isolated human blood mononuclear cells. Cells from six young men (aged 22-26 yr) were divided into separate cultures incubated in either standard ambient conditions or in one of three test conditions, hypobaric hypoxia (simulating 20,000 ft), hypobaric normoxia (20,000 ft, O2 supplemented), and normobaric hypoxia (10% O2). This design allowed differentiation between pressure-related vs. oxygen-related effects. Each subject made multiple blood donations in order that cells from all subjects were tested in all conditions. Contrary to the hypothesis, IL-1β secretion was not induced at simulated altitude in basal cell cultures. In lipopolysaccharide-stimulated cell cultures, exposure to altitude inhibited IL-1β secretion by ∼40%, and the inhibition was due to the change in pressure (P = 0.039) rather than the change in oxygen. Secretion of other factors (IL-1 receptor antagonist and soluble IL-1 receptor type II) was not inhibited. Although these results are in opposition to the original hypothesis, they provide insight regarding adaptations necessary for hematopoiesis in response to high altitude and also provide a cellular rationale for the mountain sanatoriums of the 19th and early 20th centuries.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAmerican Journal of Physiology - Regulatory Integrative and Comparative Physiology
Volume280
Issue number6 49-6
StatePublished - Jul 3 2001

Fingerprint

Interleukin-1
Pressure
Interleukin-1 Type II Receptors
Cell Culture Techniques
Oxygen
Physiological Adaptation
Interleukin-1 Receptors
Hematopoiesis
Blood Donors
Lipopolysaccharides
Monocytes
Blood Cells
Macrophages
Radiation
Cytokines
Hypoxia

Keywords

  • Altitude
  • Hypoxic
  • Mononuclear cells

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Physiology (medical)

Cite this

Influence of barometric pressure on interleukin-1β secretion. / Becker, William J.; Cannon, Joseph Gerard.

In: American Journal of Physiology - Regulatory Integrative and Comparative Physiology, Vol. 280, No. 6 49-6, 03.07.2001.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{b2823612f7b542eaa8a9fd1c12826301,
title = "Influence of barometric pressure on interleukin-1β secretion",
abstract = "Monocytes and macrophages are activated by various environmental challenges, including microorganisms, radiation, and pollutants. These cells release cytokines, such as interleukin (IL)-1β, that mediate physiological adaptations to stress. This study sought to define further the role of IL-1β in general adaptation to environmental stress by testing the hypothesis that high altitude (20,000 ft, 6,096 m) would stimulate IL-1β secretion from isolated human blood mononuclear cells. Cells from six young men (aged 22-26 yr) were divided into separate cultures incubated in either standard ambient conditions or in one of three test conditions, hypobaric hypoxia (simulating 20,000 ft), hypobaric normoxia (20,000 ft, O2 supplemented), and normobaric hypoxia (10{\%} O2). This design allowed differentiation between pressure-related vs. oxygen-related effects. Each subject made multiple blood donations in order that cells from all subjects were tested in all conditions. Contrary to the hypothesis, IL-1β secretion was not induced at simulated altitude in basal cell cultures. In lipopolysaccharide-stimulated cell cultures, exposure to altitude inhibited IL-1β secretion by ∼40{\%}, and the inhibition was due to the change in pressure (P = 0.039) rather than the change in oxygen. Secretion of other factors (IL-1 receptor antagonist and soluble IL-1 receptor type II) was not inhibited. Although these results are in opposition to the original hypothesis, they provide insight regarding adaptations necessary for hematopoiesis in response to high altitude and also provide a cellular rationale for the mountain sanatoriums of the 19th and early 20th centuries.",
keywords = "Altitude, Hypoxic, Mononuclear cells",
author = "Becker, {William J.} and Cannon, {Joseph Gerard}",
year = "2001",
month = "7",
day = "3",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "280",
journal = "American Journal of Physiology - Heart and Circulatory Physiology",
issn = "0363-6135",
publisher = "American Physiological Society",
number = "6 49-6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Influence of barometric pressure on interleukin-1β secretion

AU - Becker, William J.

AU - Cannon, Joseph Gerard

PY - 2001/7/3

Y1 - 2001/7/3

N2 - Monocytes and macrophages are activated by various environmental challenges, including microorganisms, radiation, and pollutants. These cells release cytokines, such as interleukin (IL)-1β, that mediate physiological adaptations to stress. This study sought to define further the role of IL-1β in general adaptation to environmental stress by testing the hypothesis that high altitude (20,000 ft, 6,096 m) would stimulate IL-1β secretion from isolated human blood mononuclear cells. Cells from six young men (aged 22-26 yr) were divided into separate cultures incubated in either standard ambient conditions or in one of three test conditions, hypobaric hypoxia (simulating 20,000 ft), hypobaric normoxia (20,000 ft, O2 supplemented), and normobaric hypoxia (10% O2). This design allowed differentiation between pressure-related vs. oxygen-related effects. Each subject made multiple blood donations in order that cells from all subjects were tested in all conditions. Contrary to the hypothesis, IL-1β secretion was not induced at simulated altitude in basal cell cultures. In lipopolysaccharide-stimulated cell cultures, exposure to altitude inhibited IL-1β secretion by ∼40%, and the inhibition was due to the change in pressure (P = 0.039) rather than the change in oxygen. Secretion of other factors (IL-1 receptor antagonist and soluble IL-1 receptor type II) was not inhibited. Although these results are in opposition to the original hypothesis, they provide insight regarding adaptations necessary for hematopoiesis in response to high altitude and also provide a cellular rationale for the mountain sanatoriums of the 19th and early 20th centuries.

AB - Monocytes and macrophages are activated by various environmental challenges, including microorganisms, radiation, and pollutants. These cells release cytokines, such as interleukin (IL)-1β, that mediate physiological adaptations to stress. This study sought to define further the role of IL-1β in general adaptation to environmental stress by testing the hypothesis that high altitude (20,000 ft, 6,096 m) would stimulate IL-1β secretion from isolated human blood mononuclear cells. Cells from six young men (aged 22-26 yr) were divided into separate cultures incubated in either standard ambient conditions or in one of three test conditions, hypobaric hypoxia (simulating 20,000 ft), hypobaric normoxia (20,000 ft, O2 supplemented), and normobaric hypoxia (10% O2). This design allowed differentiation between pressure-related vs. oxygen-related effects. Each subject made multiple blood donations in order that cells from all subjects were tested in all conditions. Contrary to the hypothesis, IL-1β secretion was not induced at simulated altitude in basal cell cultures. In lipopolysaccharide-stimulated cell cultures, exposure to altitude inhibited IL-1β secretion by ∼40%, and the inhibition was due to the change in pressure (P = 0.039) rather than the change in oxygen. Secretion of other factors (IL-1 receptor antagonist and soluble IL-1 receptor type II) was not inhibited. Although these results are in opposition to the original hypothesis, they provide insight regarding adaptations necessary for hematopoiesis in response to high altitude and also provide a cellular rationale for the mountain sanatoriums of the 19th and early 20th centuries.

KW - Altitude

KW - Hypoxic

KW - Mononuclear cells

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0034972717&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0034972717&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 11353697

AN - SCOPUS:0034972717

VL - 280

JO - American Journal of Physiology - Heart and Circulatory Physiology

JF - American Journal of Physiology - Heart and Circulatory Physiology

SN - 0363-6135

IS - 6 49-6

ER -