Influence of cat characteristics on Fel d 1 levels in the home

Charlotte Nicholas, Ganesa Wegienka, Suzanne Havstad, Dennis Randall Ownby, Christine Cole Johnson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Previous studies investigating cat characteristics and cat allergen production focused on clinical experiments that quantified allergen from either the shaved skin or the fur of the animal; however, these studies did not address these experimental relationships in the home. Objective: To determine the relationships between cat characteristics and cat allergen isolated from household dust. Methods: Fel d 1 allergen levels in dust from homes participating in a population-based study of environmental effect on allergy development were analyzed using a standard monoclonal antibody-based assay. Cat characteristics were based on interviews conducted during home visits by study personnel. Results: Households with any cats had higher geometric mean Fel d 1 levels than households without cats (32.88 vs 0.43; P < .01), and cat allergen levels increased with increasing numbers of cats in the home (P < .01). Length of cat hair, cat sex, reproductive status, and time spent indoors were analyzed; the only characteristic associated with higher levels of Fel d 1 was whether the cat had been neutered or spayed. Conclusions: Having cats in the home is significantly associated with increased Fel d 1 levels, and having more cats in the home is correlated with more cat allergen. Cat reproductive characteristics may be associated with measurable differences in cat allergen levels.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)47-50
Number of pages4
JournalAnnals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology
Volume101
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2008

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Cats
Allergens
Dust
Hair
House Calls
Hypersensitivity
Monoclonal Antibodies
Interviews

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine

Cite this

Influence of cat characteristics on Fel d 1 levels in the home. / Nicholas, Charlotte; Wegienka, Ganesa; Havstad, Suzanne; Ownby, Dennis Randall; Johnson, Christine Cole.

In: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology, Vol. 101, No. 1, 01.01.2008, p. 47-50.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Nicholas, Charlotte ; Wegienka, Ganesa ; Havstad, Suzanne ; Ownby, Dennis Randall ; Johnson, Christine Cole. / Influence of cat characteristics on Fel d 1 levels in the home. In: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology. 2008 ; Vol. 101, No. 1. pp. 47-50.
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