Innate function of vitamin E

Amber C. Howard, Paul L. McNeil

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

For almost a century, the biological role of vitamin E has been a scientific puzzle. Diets deficient in vitamin E lead to disease, specifically involving muscle, but the mechanism involved remained unsolved. Recent studies, reviewed here, show that vitamin E improves skeletal muscle cell survival after membrane injuries typically induced by exercise, namely by robustly promoting the rapid repair response a cell mounts to patch membrane tears. This capacity for repair promotion can explain why vitamin E is essential for muscle health. Understanding the biological function of vitamin E might provide the needed direction in the application of vitamin E as a beneficial supplement.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAgro Food Industry Hi-Tech
Volume23
Issue number4 SUPPL.
StatePublished - Jul 1 2012

Fingerprint

Vitamins
Vitamin E
vitamin E
Muscle
Repair
Membranes
Muscles
muscles
Nutrition
myocytes
Muscle Cells
cell viability
skeletal muscle
Cell Survival
Skeletal Muscle
exercise
Cells
Health
Diet
Wounds and Injuries

Keywords

  • Antioxidant
  • Membrane repair
  • Muscle
  • Repair
  • Tocopherol
  • Trolox
  • Vitamin E

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering

Cite this

Howard, A. C., & McNeil, P. L. (2012). Innate function of vitamin E. Agro Food Industry Hi-Tech, 23(4 SUPPL.).

Innate function of vitamin E. / Howard, Amber C.; McNeil, Paul L.

In: Agro Food Industry Hi-Tech, Vol. 23, No. 4 SUPPL., 01.07.2012.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Howard, AC & McNeil, PL 2012, 'Innate function of vitamin E', Agro Food Industry Hi-Tech, vol. 23, no. 4 SUPPL..
Howard AC, McNeil PL. Innate function of vitamin E. Agro Food Industry Hi-Tech. 2012 Jul 1;23(4 SUPPL.).
Howard, Amber C. ; McNeil, Paul L. / Innate function of vitamin E. In: Agro Food Industry Hi-Tech. 2012 ; Vol. 23, No. 4 SUPPL.
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