Insulin insensitivity is rapidly reversed in rats by reducing dietary fat from 40 to 30% of energy

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Abstract

The objective of this study was to determine the effect of reducing dietary fat content from 40 to 30% of total energy on body composition and insulin sensitivity in rats. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were fed either a control diet (30% energy as fat) or a high fat diet (40% energy as fat) for 10 wk. In vivo glucose tolerance tests indicated that both basal and glucose- stimulated insulin concentrations were elevated in rats fed the high fat diet. Two groups of rats offered the high fat diet were then fed the control diet (HF,C) and two that had received the high fat diet were then fed a diet (30% energy as fat) containing a fat-mimetic carbohydrate (HF,M). Two groups continued to receive the high fat diet and two groups continued to receive the control diet. Rats were killed 1 and 2 wk after the diet switch. In vivo glucose tolerance tests indicated that insulin sensitivity was corrected in HF,C and HF,M rats after 3 d. Body fat content was greater in rats fed the high fat diet and remained high after 7 d of consuming either diet with 30% of energy from fat. There was no effect of diet on liver fatty acid utilization or on diaphragm glucose oxidation. Adipocytes from all treatment groups were insulin resistant, possibly due to feeding status or age of the rats. The results of this study suggest that a moderate reduction in fat intake, from 40 to 30% of energy, can produce a rapid improvement of insulin sensitivity in insulin-insensitive rats, independent of changes in body fat content and irrespective of the means used to reduce dietary fat content.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1811-1822
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Nutrition
Volume122
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 1992
Externally publishedYes

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Keywords

  • dietary fat
  • fat-mimetic carbohydrate
  • insulin sensitivity
  • rats

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

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