Intake of polyunsaturated fatty acids and distal large bowel cancer risk in whites and African Americans

Sangmi Kim, Dale P. Sandler, Joseph Galanko, Christopher Martin, Robert S. Sandler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

42 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Long-chain ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) may have antineoplastic properties in the colon. The authors examined the association between intakes of different PUFAs and distal large bowel cancer in a population-based case-control study of 1,503 whites (716 cases; 787 controls) and 369 African Americans (213 cases; 156 controls) in North Carolina (2001-2006). Unconditional logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals for distal large bowel cancer risk in relation to quartiles of PUFA intake. Increased consumption of long-chain ω-3 PUFAs was associated with reduced risk of distal large bowel cancer in whites (multivariable odds ratios = 0.88 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.63, 1.22), 0.69 (95% CI: 0.49, 0.98), and 0.49 (95% CI: 0.34, 0.71) for second, third, and highest vs. lowest quartile) (Ptrend < 0.01). Intake of individual eicosapentaenoic acids and docosahexaenoic acids was inversely related to distal large bowel cancer risk, whereas the ratio of ω-6 to long-chain ω-3 PUFAs was associated with increased risk of distal large bowel cancer in whites, but not among African Americans (Pinteraction < 0.05). Study results support the hypothesis that long-chain ω-3 PUFAs have beneficial effects in colorectal carcinogenesis. Whether or not the possible benefit of long-chain ω-3 PUFAs varies by race warrants further evaluation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)969-979
Number of pages11
JournalAmerican Journal of Epidemiology
Volume171
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2010

Fingerprint

Unsaturated Fatty Acids
African Americans
Colonic Neoplasms
Confidence Intervals
Odds Ratio
Eicosapentaenoic Acid
Docosahexaenoic Acids
Antineoplastic Agents
Case-Control Studies
Colon
Carcinogenesis
Logistic Models
Population

Keywords

  • colorectal neoplasms
  • fatty acids omega-3
  • fatty acids unsaturated
  • intestine large

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology

Cite this

Intake of polyunsaturated fatty acids and distal large bowel cancer risk in whites and African Americans. / Kim, Sangmi; Sandler, Dale P.; Galanko, Joseph; Martin, Christopher; Sandler, Robert S.

In: American Journal of Epidemiology, Vol. 171, No. 9, 01.05.2010, p. 969-979.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kim, Sangmi ; Sandler, Dale P. ; Galanko, Joseph ; Martin, Christopher ; Sandler, Robert S. / Intake of polyunsaturated fatty acids and distal large bowel cancer risk in whites and African Americans. In: American Journal of Epidemiology. 2010 ; Vol. 171, No. 9. pp. 969-979.
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