Integrating Palliative Care into the Chronic Illness Continuum: a Conceptual Model for Minority Populations

Shena Gazaway, Merry Stewart, Autumn Schumacher

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Although the use of palliative care has increased in recent years, chronically ill Americans within a racial/ethnic minority (non-White) population underutilize this supportive and comfort-giving healthcare service. Consequently, chronically ill minority Americans experience increased pain, symptom burden, and inappropriate use of healthcare resources compared to their white counterparts. A literature review was conducted to compile and synthesize the current state of research pertinent to improving the use of palliative care among chronically ill minority Americans. Selection criteria produced 18 relevant publications, which aided in developing a conceptual model that assimilated early, episodic, and late palliative care phases along the chronic illness continuum. The goal of the conceptual model was to provide a roadmap for healthcare professionals to use when designing, implementing, managing, and/or evaluating palliative care services for chronically ill minority Americans. The literature review demonstrated that minority patients benefitted the most from culturally tailored, systematic interventions (such as advanced care planning education) in all phases of palliative care, which led to increases in advance directive completion, better symptom control, and hospice utilization. The article concludes with a discussion and fictional case study portraying the importance of culturally tailored early palliative care as a catalyst for engaging minority patients in palliative care services.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1078-1086
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Racial and Ethnic Health Disparities
Volume6
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2019

Fingerprint

Palliative Care
chronic illness
Chronic Disease
minority
chronically ill
Population
Delivery of Health Care
Advance Directives
Hospices
hospice
Patient Selection
Publications
national minority
pain
Education
utilization
Pain
planning
Research
resources

Keywords

  • Chronic illness
  • Conceptual model
  • Minority populations
  • Palliative care

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Anthropology
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Health Policy
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Integrating Palliative Care into the Chronic Illness Continuum : a Conceptual Model for Minority Populations. / Gazaway, Shena; Stewart, Merry; Schumacher, Autumn.

In: Journal of Racial and Ethnic Health Disparities, Vol. 6, No. 6, 01.12.2019, p. 1078-1086.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{a459141f34df42dca976b836e2f05023,
title = "Integrating Palliative Care into the Chronic Illness Continuum: a Conceptual Model for Minority Populations",
abstract = "Although the use of palliative care has increased in recent years, chronically ill Americans within a racial/ethnic minority (non-White) population underutilize this supportive and comfort-giving healthcare service. Consequently, chronically ill minority Americans experience increased pain, symptom burden, and inappropriate use of healthcare resources compared to their white counterparts. A literature review was conducted to compile and synthesize the current state of research pertinent to improving the use of palliative care among chronically ill minority Americans. Selection criteria produced 18 relevant publications, which aided in developing a conceptual model that assimilated early, episodic, and late palliative care phases along the chronic illness continuum. The goal of the conceptual model was to provide a roadmap for healthcare professionals to use when designing, implementing, managing, and/or evaluating palliative care services for chronically ill minority Americans. The literature review demonstrated that minority patients benefitted the most from culturally tailored, systematic interventions (such as advanced care planning education) in all phases of palliative care, which led to increases in advance directive completion, better symptom control, and hospice utilization. The article concludes with a discussion and fictional case study portraying the importance of culturally tailored early palliative care as a catalyst for engaging minority patients in palliative care services.",
keywords = "Chronic illness, Conceptual model, Minority populations, Palliative care",
author = "Shena Gazaway and Merry Stewart and Autumn Schumacher",
year = "2019",
month = "12",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1007/s40615-019-00610-y",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "6",
pages = "1078--1086",
journal = "Journal of racial and ethnic health disparities",
issn = "2197-3792",
publisher = "Springer Nature",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Integrating Palliative Care into the Chronic Illness Continuum

T2 - a Conceptual Model for Minority Populations

AU - Gazaway, Shena

AU - Stewart, Merry

AU - Schumacher, Autumn

PY - 2019/12/1

Y1 - 2019/12/1

N2 - Although the use of palliative care has increased in recent years, chronically ill Americans within a racial/ethnic minority (non-White) population underutilize this supportive and comfort-giving healthcare service. Consequently, chronically ill minority Americans experience increased pain, symptom burden, and inappropriate use of healthcare resources compared to their white counterparts. A literature review was conducted to compile and synthesize the current state of research pertinent to improving the use of palliative care among chronically ill minority Americans. Selection criteria produced 18 relevant publications, which aided in developing a conceptual model that assimilated early, episodic, and late palliative care phases along the chronic illness continuum. The goal of the conceptual model was to provide a roadmap for healthcare professionals to use when designing, implementing, managing, and/or evaluating palliative care services for chronically ill minority Americans. The literature review demonstrated that minority patients benefitted the most from culturally tailored, systematic interventions (such as advanced care planning education) in all phases of palliative care, which led to increases in advance directive completion, better symptom control, and hospice utilization. The article concludes with a discussion and fictional case study portraying the importance of culturally tailored early palliative care as a catalyst for engaging minority patients in palliative care services.

AB - Although the use of palliative care has increased in recent years, chronically ill Americans within a racial/ethnic minority (non-White) population underutilize this supportive and comfort-giving healthcare service. Consequently, chronically ill minority Americans experience increased pain, symptom burden, and inappropriate use of healthcare resources compared to their white counterparts. A literature review was conducted to compile and synthesize the current state of research pertinent to improving the use of palliative care among chronically ill minority Americans. Selection criteria produced 18 relevant publications, which aided in developing a conceptual model that assimilated early, episodic, and late palliative care phases along the chronic illness continuum. The goal of the conceptual model was to provide a roadmap for healthcare professionals to use when designing, implementing, managing, and/or evaluating palliative care services for chronically ill minority Americans. The literature review demonstrated that minority patients benefitted the most from culturally tailored, systematic interventions (such as advanced care planning education) in all phases of palliative care, which led to increases in advance directive completion, better symptom control, and hospice utilization. The article concludes with a discussion and fictional case study portraying the importance of culturally tailored early palliative care as a catalyst for engaging minority patients in palliative care services.

KW - Chronic illness

KW - Conceptual model

KW - Minority populations

KW - Palliative care

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85068311320&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85068311320&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s40615-019-00610-y

DO - 10.1007/s40615-019-00610-y

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:85068311320

VL - 6

SP - 1078

EP - 1086

JO - Journal of racial and ethnic health disparities

JF - Journal of racial and ethnic health disparities

SN - 2197-3792

IS - 6

ER -