Interactions among phosphate amendments, microbes and uranium mobility in contaminated sediments

Anna Sophia Knox, R. L. Brigmon, D. I. Kaplan, Michael H Paller

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The use of sequestering agents for the transformation of radionuclides in low concentrations in contaminated soils/sediments offers considerable potential for environmental cleanup. This study evaluated the influence of three types of phosphate (rock phosphate, biological phosphate, and calcium phytate) and two microbial amendments (Alcaligenes piechaudii and Pseudomonas putida) on U mobility. All tested phosphate amendments reduced aqueous U concentrations more than 90%, likely due to formation of insoluble phosphate precipitates. The addition of A. piechaudii and P. putida alone were found to reduce U concentrations 63% and 31%, respectively. Uranium removal in phosphate treatments was significantly reduced in the presence of the two microbes. Two sediments were evaluated in experiments on the effects of phosphate amendments on U mobility, one from a stream on the Department of Energy's Savannah River Site near Aiken, SC and the other from the Hanford Site, a Department of Energy facility in Washington state. Increased microbial activity in the treated sediment led to a reduction in phosphate effectiveness. The average U concentration in 1 M MgCl2 extract from U contaminated sediment was 437 μg/kg, but in the same sediment without microbes (autoclaved), the extractable U concentration was only 103 μg/kg. The U concentration in the 1 M MgCl2 extract was ∼ 0 μg/kg in autoclaved amended sediment treated with autoclaved biological apatite. These results suggest that microbes may reduce phosphate amendment remedial effectiveness.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)63-71
Number of pages9
JournalScience of the Total Environment
Volume395
Issue number2-3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2008

Fingerprint

Uranium
uranium
Sediments
Phosphates
phosphate
sediment
Magnesium Chloride
Sequestering Agents
Apatites
Phytic Acid
phosphate rock
cleanup
Apatite
Radioisotopes
apatite
microbial activity
energy
radionuclide
Precipitates
Calcium

Keywords

  • Alcaligenes piechaudii
  • Apatite
  • Microbial activity
  • Pseudomonas putida
  • Uranium

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Engineering
  • Environmental Chemistry
  • Waste Management and Disposal
  • Pollution

Cite this

Interactions among phosphate amendments, microbes and uranium mobility in contaminated sediments. / Knox, Anna Sophia; Brigmon, R. L.; Kaplan, D. I.; Paller, Michael H.

In: Science of the Total Environment, Vol. 395, No. 2-3, 01.06.2008, p. 63-71.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Knox, Anna Sophia ; Brigmon, R. L. ; Kaplan, D. I. ; Paller, Michael H. / Interactions among phosphate amendments, microbes and uranium mobility in contaminated sediments. In: Science of the Total Environment. 2008 ; Vol. 395, No. 2-3. pp. 63-71.
@article{d0ba867ba1674dd886b40aa675a85779,
title = "Interactions among phosphate amendments, microbes and uranium mobility in contaminated sediments",
abstract = "The use of sequestering agents for the transformation of radionuclides in low concentrations in contaminated soils/sediments offers considerable potential for environmental cleanup. This study evaluated the influence of three types of phosphate (rock phosphate, biological phosphate, and calcium phytate) and two microbial amendments (Alcaligenes piechaudii and Pseudomonas putida) on U mobility. All tested phosphate amendments reduced aqueous U concentrations more than 90{\%}, likely due to formation of insoluble phosphate precipitates. The addition of A. piechaudii and P. putida alone were found to reduce U concentrations 63{\%} and 31{\%}, respectively. Uranium removal in phosphate treatments was significantly reduced in the presence of the two microbes. Two sediments were evaluated in experiments on the effects of phosphate amendments on U mobility, one from a stream on the Department of Energy's Savannah River Site near Aiken, SC and the other from the Hanford Site, a Department of Energy facility in Washington state. Increased microbial activity in the treated sediment led to a reduction in phosphate effectiveness. The average U concentration in 1 M MgCl2 extract from U contaminated sediment was 437 μg/kg, but in the same sediment without microbes (autoclaved), the extractable U concentration was only 103 μg/kg. The U concentration in the 1 M MgCl2 extract was ∼ 0 μg/kg in autoclaved amended sediment treated with autoclaved biological apatite. These results suggest that microbes may reduce phosphate amendment remedial effectiveness.",
keywords = "Alcaligenes piechaudii, Apatite, Microbial activity, Pseudomonas putida, Uranium",
author = "Knox, {Anna Sophia} and Brigmon, {R. L.} and Kaplan, {D. I.} and Paller, {Michael H}",
year = "2008",
month = "6",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.scitotenv.2008.01.061",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "395",
pages = "63--71",
journal = "Science of the Total Environment",
issn = "0048-9697",
publisher = "Elsevier",
number = "2-3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Interactions among phosphate amendments, microbes and uranium mobility in contaminated sediments

AU - Knox, Anna Sophia

AU - Brigmon, R. L.

AU - Kaplan, D. I.

AU - Paller, Michael H

PY - 2008/6/1

Y1 - 2008/6/1

N2 - The use of sequestering agents for the transformation of radionuclides in low concentrations in contaminated soils/sediments offers considerable potential for environmental cleanup. This study evaluated the influence of three types of phosphate (rock phosphate, biological phosphate, and calcium phytate) and two microbial amendments (Alcaligenes piechaudii and Pseudomonas putida) on U mobility. All tested phosphate amendments reduced aqueous U concentrations more than 90%, likely due to formation of insoluble phosphate precipitates. The addition of A. piechaudii and P. putida alone were found to reduce U concentrations 63% and 31%, respectively. Uranium removal in phosphate treatments was significantly reduced in the presence of the two microbes. Two sediments were evaluated in experiments on the effects of phosphate amendments on U mobility, one from a stream on the Department of Energy's Savannah River Site near Aiken, SC and the other from the Hanford Site, a Department of Energy facility in Washington state. Increased microbial activity in the treated sediment led to a reduction in phosphate effectiveness. The average U concentration in 1 M MgCl2 extract from U contaminated sediment was 437 μg/kg, but in the same sediment without microbes (autoclaved), the extractable U concentration was only 103 μg/kg. The U concentration in the 1 M MgCl2 extract was ∼ 0 μg/kg in autoclaved amended sediment treated with autoclaved biological apatite. These results suggest that microbes may reduce phosphate amendment remedial effectiveness.

AB - The use of sequestering agents for the transformation of radionuclides in low concentrations in contaminated soils/sediments offers considerable potential for environmental cleanup. This study evaluated the influence of three types of phosphate (rock phosphate, biological phosphate, and calcium phytate) and two microbial amendments (Alcaligenes piechaudii and Pseudomonas putida) on U mobility. All tested phosphate amendments reduced aqueous U concentrations more than 90%, likely due to formation of insoluble phosphate precipitates. The addition of A. piechaudii and P. putida alone were found to reduce U concentrations 63% and 31%, respectively. Uranium removal in phosphate treatments was significantly reduced in the presence of the two microbes. Two sediments were evaluated in experiments on the effects of phosphate amendments on U mobility, one from a stream on the Department of Energy's Savannah River Site near Aiken, SC and the other from the Hanford Site, a Department of Energy facility in Washington state. Increased microbial activity in the treated sediment led to a reduction in phosphate effectiveness. The average U concentration in 1 M MgCl2 extract from U contaminated sediment was 437 μg/kg, but in the same sediment without microbes (autoclaved), the extractable U concentration was only 103 μg/kg. The U concentration in the 1 M MgCl2 extract was ∼ 0 μg/kg in autoclaved amended sediment treated with autoclaved biological apatite. These results suggest that microbes may reduce phosphate amendment remedial effectiveness.

KW - Alcaligenes piechaudii

KW - Apatite

KW - Microbial activity

KW - Pseudomonas putida

KW - Uranium

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=41549161033&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=41549161033&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2008.01.061

DO - 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2008.01.061

M3 - Article

C2 - 18374392

AN - SCOPUS:41549161033

VL - 395

SP - 63

EP - 71

JO - Science of the Total Environment

JF - Science of the Total Environment

SN - 0048-9697

IS - 2-3

ER -