Internet-enabled interactive multimedia asthma education program: A randomized trial

Santosh Krishna, Benjamin D. Francisco, E. Andrew Balas, Peter König, Gavin R. Graff, Richard W. Madsen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

192 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective. To determine whether health outcomes of children who have asthma can be improved through the use of an Internet-enabled interactive multimedia asthma education program. Methods. Two hundred twenty-eight children with asthma visiting a pediatric pulmonary clinic were randomly assigned to control and intervention groups. Children and caregivers in both groups received traditional patient education based on the National Asthma Education and Prevention Program. Intervention group participants received additional self-management education through the Interactive Multimedia Program for Asthma Control and Tracking. Pediatric Asthma Care Knowledge Survey, Pediatric Asthma Caregiver's Quality of Life Questionnaire, asthma symptom history, spirometry, and health services utilization data were collected at the initial visit and at 3 and 12 months. Results. Interactive Multimedia Program for Asthma Control and Tracking significantly increased asthma knowledge of children and caregivers, decreased asthma symptom days (81 vs 51 per year), and decreased number of emergency department visits (1.93 vs 0.62 per year) among the intervention group participants. The intervention group children were also using a significantly lower average daily dose of inhaled corticosteroids (434 vs 754 μg [beclomethasone equivalents]) at visit 3. Asthma knowledge of all 7- to 17-year-old children correlated with fewer urgent physician visits (r = 0.37) and less frequent use of quick-relief medicines (r = 0.30). Conclusions. Supplementing conventional asthma care with interactive multimedia education can significantly improve asthma knowledge and reduce the burden of childhood asthma.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)503-510
Number of pages8
JournalPediatrics
Volume111
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2003

Fingerprint

Multimedia
Internet
Asthma
Education
Caregivers
Pediatrics
Beclomethasone
Spirometry
Patient Education
Self Care

Keywords

  • Asthma
  • Computer
  • Education
  • Interactive
  • Internet
  • Multimedia
  • Pediatric
  • Self-management

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Krishna, S., Francisco, B. D., Andrew Balas, E., König, P., Graff, G. R., & Madsen, R. W. (2003). Internet-enabled interactive multimedia asthma education program: A randomized trial. Pediatrics, 111(3), 503-510. https://doi.org/10.1542/peds.111.3.503

Internet-enabled interactive multimedia asthma education program : A randomized trial. / Krishna, Santosh; Francisco, Benjamin D.; Andrew Balas, E.; König, Peter; Graff, Gavin R.; Madsen, Richard W.

In: Pediatrics, Vol. 111, No. 3, 01.03.2003, p. 503-510.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Krishna, S, Francisco, BD, Andrew Balas, E, König, P, Graff, GR & Madsen, RW 2003, 'Internet-enabled interactive multimedia asthma education program: A randomized trial', Pediatrics, vol. 111, no. 3, pp. 503-510. https://doi.org/10.1542/peds.111.3.503
Krishna, Santosh ; Francisco, Benjamin D. ; Andrew Balas, E. ; König, Peter ; Graff, Gavin R. ; Madsen, Richard W. / Internet-enabled interactive multimedia asthma education program : A randomized trial. In: Pediatrics. 2003 ; Vol. 111, No. 3. pp. 503-510.
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