Intrasubstance ruptures of the biceps brachii: Diagnosis and management

David J. Wilson, Stephen Arthur Parada, John M. Slevin, Edward D. Arrington

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Traumatic intrasubstance ruptures of the biceps brachii are rare and historically specific to military static line parachute jumps; however, these injuries have recently been reported in the civilian literature. Diagnosis is made by history, clinical weakness in supination and elbow flexion, extensive ecchymosis and edema, and a palpable defect. Ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging are useful to confirm the diagnosis and injury severity. Nonoperative treatment involves splinting in acute flexion. Percutaneous hematoma aspiration has been described. Early surgical intervention with primary repair has been shown to be more successful than late reconstruction. Studies comparing operative and nonoperative treatment are lacking.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)890-896
Number of pages7
JournalOrthopedics
Volume34
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2011
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Rupture
Ecchymosis
Supination
Wounds and Injuries
Elbow
Hematoma
Edema
History
Magnetic Resonance Imaging

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

Cite this

Intrasubstance ruptures of the biceps brachii : Diagnosis and management. / Wilson, David J.; Parada, Stephen Arthur; Slevin, John M.; Arrington, Edward D.

In: Orthopedics, Vol. 34, No. 11, 01.11.2011, p. 890-896.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Wilson, David J. ; Parada, Stephen Arthur ; Slevin, John M. ; Arrington, Edward D. / Intrasubstance ruptures of the biceps brachii : Diagnosis and management. In: Orthopedics. 2011 ; Vol. 34, No. 11. pp. 890-896.
@article{c05202fba7ae439f8674a1aceb74cdde,
title = "Intrasubstance ruptures of the biceps brachii: Diagnosis and management",
abstract = "Traumatic intrasubstance ruptures of the biceps brachii are rare and historically specific to military static line parachute jumps; however, these injuries have recently been reported in the civilian literature. Diagnosis is made by history, clinical weakness in supination and elbow flexion, extensive ecchymosis and edema, and a palpable defect. Ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging are useful to confirm the diagnosis and injury severity. Nonoperative treatment involves splinting in acute flexion. Percutaneous hematoma aspiration has been described. Early surgical intervention with primary repair has been shown to be more successful than late reconstruction. Studies comparing operative and nonoperative treatment are lacking.",
author = "Wilson, {David J.} and Parada, {Stephen Arthur} and Slevin, {John M.} and Arrington, {Edward D.}",
year = "2011",
month = "11",
day = "1",
doi = "10.3928/01477447-20110922-25",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "34",
pages = "890--896",
journal = "Orthopedics",
issn = "0147-7447",
publisher = "Slack Incorporated",
number = "11",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Intrasubstance ruptures of the biceps brachii

T2 - Diagnosis and management

AU - Wilson, David J.

AU - Parada, Stephen Arthur

AU - Slevin, John M.

AU - Arrington, Edward D.

PY - 2011/11/1

Y1 - 2011/11/1

N2 - Traumatic intrasubstance ruptures of the biceps brachii are rare and historically specific to military static line parachute jumps; however, these injuries have recently been reported in the civilian literature. Diagnosis is made by history, clinical weakness in supination and elbow flexion, extensive ecchymosis and edema, and a palpable defect. Ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging are useful to confirm the diagnosis and injury severity. Nonoperative treatment involves splinting in acute flexion. Percutaneous hematoma aspiration has been described. Early surgical intervention with primary repair has been shown to be more successful than late reconstruction. Studies comparing operative and nonoperative treatment are lacking.

AB - Traumatic intrasubstance ruptures of the biceps brachii are rare and historically specific to military static line parachute jumps; however, these injuries have recently been reported in the civilian literature. Diagnosis is made by history, clinical weakness in supination and elbow flexion, extensive ecchymosis and edema, and a palpable defect. Ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging are useful to confirm the diagnosis and injury severity. Nonoperative treatment involves splinting in acute flexion. Percutaneous hematoma aspiration has been described. Early surgical intervention with primary repair has been shown to be more successful than late reconstruction. Studies comparing operative and nonoperative treatment are lacking.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=81255205341&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=81255205341&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.3928/01477447-20110922-25

DO - 10.3928/01477447-20110922-25

M3 - Review article

C2 - 22050257

AN - SCOPUS:81255205341

VL - 34

SP - 890

EP - 896

JO - Orthopedics

JF - Orthopedics

SN - 0147-7447

IS - 11

ER -